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История коренных народов Северной Америки

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Westholme Publishing, 2012. — 448 p. Sioux War Dispatches: Reports from the Field, 1876-1877 , tells the story of the Great Sioux War, including the battle of the Little Big Horn, primarily through the eyes of contemporary newspaper correspondents, both civilian and military. The volume begins with the Black Hills dilemma and the issue of the unceded territory (the disputed lands...
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Westholme Publishing, 2012. — 448 p. Sioux War Dispatches: Reports from the Field, 1876-1877 , tells the story of the Great Sioux War, including the battle of the Little Big Horn, primarily through the eyes of contemporary newspaper correspondents, both civilian and military. The volume begins with the Black Hills dilemma and the issue of the unceded territory (the disputed lands...
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The University of Alabama Press, 2005. — 604 p. In the spring of 1775, James Adair’s History of the American Indians was released by publishers Edward and Charles Dilly of London. The book was actually a study of the major tribes residing adjacent to Britain’s southern colonies, particularly the Cherokee, Chickasaw, Creek, and Choctaw Indians. In addition to providing a survey of...
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Oxford University Press, 1995. — 232 p. This book is the first comprehensive study of the driving force behind Native political activism, and the only scholarly treatment of North American Indian politics which integrates an explicitly Native perspective. With a broad historical scope rich in detail, and drawing on the particular experience of the Mohawks of Kahnawake, it offers...
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Open Road Integrated Media, 2014. — 551 p. On the sparkling morning of June 25, 1876, 611 men of the United States 7th Cavalry rode toward the banks of the Little Bighorn in the Montana Territory, where 3,000 Indians stood waiting for battle. The lives of two great warriors would soon be forever linked throughout history: Crazy Horse, leader of the Oglala Sioux, and General...
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Foreword by Raymond J. DeMallie — University of Oklahoma Press, 2018. — 432 p. The inception of the Ghost Dance religion in 1890 marked a critical moment in Lakota history. Yet, because this movement alarmed government officials, culminating in the infamous massacre at Wounded Knee of 250 Lakota men, women, and children, historical accounts have most often described the Ghost...
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University of Nebraska Press, 2008. — 464 p. A broad range of perspectives from Natives and non-Natives makes this book the most complete account and analysis of the Lakota ghost dance ever published. A revitalization movement that swept across Native communities of the West in the late 1880s, the ghost dance took firm hold among the Lakotas, perplexed and alarmed government...
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University of Oklahoma Press, 2000. — 352 p. One of the small group of tribes comprising the Illinois division of the Algonquian linguistic family, the Miamis emerged as a pivotal tribe only during the French and British imperial wars, the Miami Confederacy wars of the eighteenth century, and the treaty-making period of the nineteenth century. The Miamis reached their peak of...
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Carleton University Press, 1997. — 450 p. This formative history takes a new look at a dramatic conflict-the war on the Detroit frontier in 1812-13. Powerful key players (Procter, Tecumseh and Brock), their disparate war aims, and the "all or nothing" character of the campaigns they waged still seem larger than life. Yet Sandy Antal's careful reconstruction of Native and national...
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Ottawa: The Golden Dog Press, 1995. — 238 p. This volume is the result of the author's research into the history of the Western fur trade and its impact on the Plains Indians. It is also a study of the commercial elements underpinning the fur trade and the effect of the White Man's penetration of the territory of Saskatchewan and Missouri rivers. As such, it seeks to bring a...
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New York: John Wiley & Sons, Inc., 2000. — 378 p. The men of the Second Cavalry went to Texas to fight Indians. Then they returned east to fight each other. The creation of the Second Cavalry in 1855 was a watershed event in the history of the United States Army. Ordered to engage the Native American tribes whose persistent raids were slowing the settlement of the West, the...
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Cobblehill Books/Dutton, 1996. — 54 p. From 1875 to 1878, the Castillo de San Marcos, renamed Fort Marion, located in Florida, was used as a prison for 72 Plains Indians who had been taken prisoner during the Indian wars. They were eventually allowed to visit the nearby town of Saint Augustine. Some gained famed as the "Fort Marion artists" as they recreated in art scenes from...
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University of Alabama Press, 2003. — 380 p. A comprehensive history of the Chickasaw tribe, whose territory, before they were removed to lands in Oklahoma in the 1800s, was located east of the Mississippi river. The author traces their history as far back as documentation and archaeology allow and historicizes from a native viewpoint.
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Oxford University Press, 1992. — 400 p. In this provocative and timely collection of essays - five published for the first time--one of the most important ethnohistorians writing today, James Axtell, explores the key role of imagination both in our perception of strangers and in the writing of history. Coinciding with the 500th anniversary of Columbus's "discovery" of America,...
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Cambridge University Press, 2016. — 333 p. — (Studies in North American Indian History). As a definitive study of the poorly understood Apaches de paz, this book explains how war-weary, mutually suspicious Apaches and Spaniards negotiated an ambivalent compromise after 1786 that produced over four decades of uneasy peace across the region. In response to drought and military...
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Oxford University Press, 2018. — 320 p. Narratives of cultural encounter in colonial North America often contrast traditional Indian coastal-dwellers and intrepid European seafarers. In Storm of the Sea, Matthew R. Bahar instead tells the forgotten history of Indian pirates hijacking European sailing ships on the rough waters of the north Atlantic and of an Indian navy pressing...
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University of Oklahoma Press, 1980. — 320 p. — (The Civilization of the American Indian series, v. 152). Traces the history of this Arkansas River valley tribe, describes their culture, and shows how they were affected by westward expansion. W. David Baird , Dean Emeritus of Seaver College, Howard A. White Professor Emeritus of History, Humanities/Teacher Education Division,...
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University of Arizona Press, 1972. — 222 p. — (Narrated by James Kaywaykla). A history of the events of the 1870's and 1880's as related by the last remaining Apache survivor of Tres Castillus. This volume contains a great deal of interesting information. The Apache point of view is presented with great clarity. A genuine contribution to the story of the Apache wars, and a very...
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University of Oklahoma Press, 2005. — 352 p. Dennis Banks, an American Indian of the Ojibwa Tribe and a founder of the American Indian Movement, is one of the most influential Indian leaders of our time. In "Ojibwa Warrior", written with acclaimed writer and photographer Richard Erdoes, Banks tells his own story for the first time and also traces the rise of the American Indian...
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Belknap Press, 2007. — 352 p. Between the early seventeenth century and the early twentieth,nearly all the land in the United States was transferred from AmericanIndians to whites. This dramatic transformation has been understood in two very different ways - as a series of consensual transactions, but also as a process of violent conquest. Both views cannot be correct. How did...
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Michigan State University Press, 2004. — 228 p. Originally published in 1837 in Europe in German, French, and Slovenian editions, Baraga’s "Short History of the North American Indians" is the personal, first-hand account of a Catholic missionary in the Great Lakes area of North America. Baraga served as a missionary and as bishop of Sault Ste. Marie and Marquette, from 1830...
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McGill-Queen's University Press, 2019. — 336 p. Two centuries ago, many hundreds of Iroquois - principally from what is now Kahnawà:ke - left home without leaving behind their ways of life. Recruited to man the large canoes that transported trade goods and animal pelts from and to Montreal, some Iroquois soon returned, while others were enticed ever further west by the rapidly...
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McGill-Queen's University Press, 2019. — 336 p. Two centuries ago, many hundreds of Iroquois - principally from what is now Kahnawà:ke - left home without leaving behind their ways of life. Recruited to man the large canoes that transported trade goods and animal pelts from and to Montreal, some Iroquois soon returned, while others were enticed ever further west by the rapidly...
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University Press of Mississippi, 2016. — 224 p. "The Natchez Indians: A History to 1735" is the story of the Natchez Indians as revealed through accounts of Spanish, English, and French explorers, missionaries, soldiers, and colonists, and in the archaeological record. Because of their strategic location on the Mississippi River, the Natchez Indians played a crucial part in the...
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Praeger, 2006. — 216 p. "Unconquered" explores the complex world of Iroquois warfare, providing a narrative overview of nearly two hundred years of Iroquois conflict during the colonial era of North America. Detailing Iroquois wars against the French, English, Americans, and a host of Indian enemies, Unconquered builds upon decades of modern scholarship to reveal the vital...
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The University of North Carolina Press, 2007. — 416 p. Revising the standard narrative of European-Indian relations in America, Juliana Barr reconstructs a world in which Indians were the dominant power and Europeans were the ones forced to accommodate, resist, and persevere. She demonstrates that between the 1690s and 1780s, Indian peoples including Caddos, Apaches, Payayas,...
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Salem Press, 2002. — 854 p. — (Two Volume Set) This collection surveys Native American history from ancient times to the twentieth century. Entries cover specific topics and incidents from a Native American perspective, in categories of Pre-Columbian history, Colonial history, Eighteenth century history, Nineteenth century history, Twentieth century history, Court cases and...
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Skyhorse Publishing, 2011. — 123 p. — ISBN 1456598279. First published in 1906, Geronimo is the collaborative work between Geronimo, chief of the Chiricahua Apache, and author S. M. Barrett. The latter was given special permission from President Theodore Roosevelt to interview Geronimo while he was a prisoner of war at Fort Sill, Oklahoma. What Barrett recorded is a blunt,...
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Vancouver BC: UBC Press, 1997. — xix, 252 p. : ill. In 1944, the Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (CCF) swept to power in Saskatchewan, thereby establishing what the popular press described as the first socialist government in North America. Led by the dynamic Tommy Douglas, the CCF vowed to create a society based on principles of cooperation rather than competition and to...
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Clarkson N. Potter, 1966. — 80 p. Personal memoir of Carl Sweezy (1881-1953), a full-blooded Arapaho artist, as told to Altha Bass.
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University of Florida Press, 2016. — 248 p. The history of Native Americans in the U.S. South is a turbulent one, rife with conflict and inequality. Since the arrival of Spanish conquistadors in the fifteenth century, Native peoples have struggled to maintain their land, cultures, and ways of life. In We Will Always Be Here, contemporary tribal leaders, educators, and activists...
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Michigan State University Press, 2012. — 256 p. A remarkable multifaceted history, Contested Territories examines a region that played an essential role in America's post-revolutionary expansion—the Lower Great Lakes region, once known as the Northwest Territory. As French, English, and finally American settlers moved westward and intersected with Native American communities, the...
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Caxton Press, 1999. — 475 p. In August 1864, Cheyenne and Sioux warriors launched a serires of raids on the "road ranches" along the California-Oregon Train in Nebraska Territory, killing, wounding or capturing dozens of white settlers. Massacre Along the Medicine Road details that violent summer, as seen through the eyes of the people who were the targets of the attacks.
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University of Nebraska Press, 2019. — 330 p. Unfair Labor? is the first book to explore the economic impact of Native Americans who participated in the 1893 World’s Columbian Exposition held in Chicago. By the late nineteenth century, tribal economic systems across the Americas were decimated, and tribal members were desperate to find ways to support their families and control...
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University of Oklahoma Press, 2013. — 328 p. In summer 1862, Minnesotans found themselves fighting interconnected wars—the first against the rebellious Southern states, and the second an internal war against the Sioux. While the Civil War was more important to the future of the United States, the Dakota War of 1862 proved far more destructive to the people of Minnesota—both whites...
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Wesleyan University Press, 2018. — 334 p. Henry 'Opukaha'ia (ca. 1792–1818), Native Hawaiian, and Itankusun Wanbli (ca. 1879–1900), Oglala Lakota, lived almost a century apart. Yet the cultural circumstances that led them to leave their homelands and eventually die in Connecticut have striking similarities. p kaha ia was orphaned during the turmoil caused in part by Kamehameha’s...
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Univercity of Toronto Press, 1998. — 307 p. The story of Iroquois participation in the War of 1812 has not received detailed examination, and there have consequently been major gaps in our understanding of the Iroquois, their relations with Euroamerican society, and the course of the war itself. Author explores this involvement by focusing on Iroquois diplomatic, military, and...
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McGill-Queen's University Press, 2008. — 520 p. Uqalurait, pointed snowdrifts formed by Arctic blizzards, "would tell us which direction to go in", says elder Mariano Aupilarjuk. This oral history, guided by the traditional knowledge of Inuit elders from across Nunavut, also follows the uqalurait, with thousands of quotes from elders on a wide range of subjects.
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University of Nebraska Press, 2018. — 324 p. How the West Was Drawn explores the geographic and historical experiences of the Pawnees, the Iowas, and the Lakotas during the European and American contest for imperial control of the Great Plains during the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. David Bernstein argues that the American West was a collaborative construction between...
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University of Wisconsin Press, 1995. — 304 p. The first comprehensive history of Native American tribes in Wisconsin, this thorough and thoroughly readable account follows Wisconsin’s Indian communities - Ojibwa, Potawatomie, Menominee, Winnebago, Oneida, Stockbridge-Munsee, and Ottawa - from the 1600s through 1960. Written for students and general readers, it covers in detail the...
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University of Oklahoma Press, 2001. — 263 p. In "Common and Contested Ground", Theodore Binnema provides a sweeping and innovative interpretation of the history of the northwestern plains and its peoples from prehistoric times to the Lewis and Clark Expedition. The real history of the northwestern plains between a.d. 200 and 1806 was far more complex, nuanced, and paradoxical than...
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University of Wisconsin Press, 2000. — 264 p. More mounds were built by ancient Native American societies in Wisconsin than in any other region of North America - between 15,000 and 20,000 mounds, at least 4,000 of which remain today. Most impressive are the effigy mounds, huge earthworks sculpted into the shapes of birds, animals, and other forms, not found anywhere else in the...
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2nd Edition — University of Wisconsin Press, 2017. — 304 p. More mounds were built by ancient Native Americans in Wisconsin than in any other region of North America - between 15,000 and 20,000, at least 4,000 of which remain today. Most impressive are the effigy mounds, huge earthworks sculpted in the shapes of thunderbirds, water panthers, and other forms, not found anywhere...
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McGill-Queen's University Press, 2004. — 184 p. In Harvest of Souls Carole Blackburn uses the Jesuit Relations to shed light on the dialogue between Jesuit missionaries and the Native peoples of northeastern North America, providing a historical anthropology of two cultures attempting to understand, contend with, and accommodate each other in the new world.
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Harvard University Press, 2006. — 372 p. American Indians remain familiar as icons, yet poorly understood as historical agents. In this ambitious book that ranges across Utah, Nevada, New Mexico, Colorado, and eastern California (a region known as the Great Basin), Ned Blackhawk places Native peoples squarely at the center of a dynamic and complex story as he chronicles two...
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Westholme Publishing, 2012. — 335 p. In "Dark and Bloody Ground: The American Revolution Along the Southern Frontier", Richard Blackmon uses a wealth of primary source material to recount the confl ict between American Indians and Anglo-Americans in the colonial South during one of the most turbulent periods of North American history. He explains the complex points of contact in...
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Center of Military History, US Army, 2014. — 50 p. In many respects, the Creek War of 1813–1814 is considered part of the Southern Theater of the War of 1812. The Creek War grew out of a civil war that pitted Creek Indians striving to maintain their traditional culture, called Red Sticks, against those Creeks who sought to assimilate with United States society. Spurred by...
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Yale University Press, 2018. — 408 p. The first book-length biography of Richard Oakes, a Red Power activist of the 1960s who was a leader in the Alcatraz takeover and the Indigenous rights movement. A revealing portrait of Richard Oakes, the brilliant, charismatic Native American leader who was instrumental in the takeovers of Alcatraz, Fort Lawton, and Pit River and whose...
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University of Nebraska Press, 1967. — 592 p. This remarkable pictographic history consists of more than four hundred drawings and script notations by Amos Bad Heart Bull, an Oglala Lakota man from the Pine Ridge Reservation, made between 1890 and the time of his death in 1913. The text, resulting from nearly a decade of research by Helen H. Blish and originally presented as a...
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Lincoln, NE: University of Nebraska Press, 2012. — xiv, 277 p.; 17 maps, 1 glossary, index. — (Borderlands and Transcultural Studies). Borderlands violence, so explosive in our own time, has deep roots in history. Lance R. Blyth’s study of Chiricahua Apaches and the presidio of Janos in the U.S.-Mexican borderlands reveals how no single entity had a monopoly on coercion, and how...
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University of British Columbia Press, 1992. — 170 p. When the Methodist missionary Thomas Crosby arrived in Port Simpson in northwestern British Columbia in 1874, he did so at the invitation of the Tsimshian people. Earlier contact with the Anglican missionary William Duncan had convinced them that, although many aspects of his mission program were appealing, his brand of religion...
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Foreword by Alan Gallay. — University of Nebraska Press, 2018. — 372 p. The Yamasee Indians are best known for their involvement in the Indian slave trade and the eighteenth-century war (1715–54) that took their name. Yet, their significance in colonial history is far larger than that. Denise I. Bossy brings together archaeologists of South Carolina and Florida with historians of...
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University of Nebraska Press, 2016. — 270 p. The Ohio River Valley was a place of violence in the nineteenth century, something witnessed on multiple stages ranging from local conflicts between indigenous and Euro-American communities to the Battle of Tippecanoe and the War of 1812. To describe these events as simply the result of American expansion versus Indigenous nativism...
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With contributions by Steven L. Cox and Ruth H. Whitehead — University of Nebraska Press, 2004. — 388 p. Twelve Thousand Years: American Indians in Maine documents the generations of Native peoples who for twelve millennia have moved through and eventually settled along the rocky coast, rivers, lakes, valleys, and mountains of a region now known as Maine. Arriving first to this...
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University of Alabama Press, 2005. — 160 p. The Westo Indians, who lived in the Savannah River region during the second half of the 17th century, are mentioned in few primary documents and only infrequently in secondary literature. There are no known Westo archaeological sites; no artifacts can be linked to the group; and no more than a single word of their language is known to us...
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University of British Columbia Press, 2017. — 220 p. We Interrupt This Program tells the story of how Indigenous people are using media tactics or interventions in art, film, television, and journalism to disrupt Canada's national narratives and rewrite them from Indigenous perspectives. Accounts of strategically chosen moments such as survivor testimonies at the Truth and...
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University of Oklahoma Press, 2009. — 312 p. Despite the popular assumption that Native American cultures in New England declined after Europeans arrived, evidence suggests that Indian communities continued to thrive alongside English colonists. In this sequel to her "Native People of Southern New England, 1500–1650", Kathleen J. Bragdon continues the Indian story through the end...
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Roberts Rinehart Publishers, 2013. — 628 p. Who were the first settlers in North America? Where did they come from? How did they survive? In this expansive one-volume account of the native peoples of North America, eminent historian William Brandon who devoted much of his life to examining this subject presents this revelatory history of the development and culture of the native...
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University of Oklahoma Press, 2008. — 510 p. Crazy Horse was as much feared by tribal foes as he was honored by allies. His war record was unmatched by any of his peers, and his rout of Custer at the Little Bighorn reverberates through history. Yet so much about him is unknown or steeped in legend. Crazy Horse: A Lakota Life corrects older, idealized accounts - and draws on a...
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University of Oklahoma Press, 2002. — 336 p. Using Cheyenne and Arapaho accounts, Charles J. Brill tells the story of General George Armstrong Custer’s winter campaign on the southern plains in 1868-69, including his attack in Black Kettle’s village on the snowy backs of the Washita River. Brill’s searing account details the ruthlessness of the U.S. Army’s efforts to punish...
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University of British Columbia Press, 2011. — 324 p. First-hand accounts of indigenous people’s encounters with colonialism are rare. A daily diary that extends over fifty years and two thousand pages is unparalleled. Drawing on a painstaking transcription of Arthur Wellington Clah’s diaries, Peggy Brock pieces together the many voyages -- physical, cultural, intellectual, and...
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Yale University Press, 2018. — 448 p. A compelling and original recovery of Native American resistance and adaptation to colonial America With rigorous original scholarship and creative narration, Lisa Brooks recovers a complex picture of war, captivity, and Native resistance during the “First Indian War” (later named King Philip’s War) by relaying the stories of Weetamoo, a...
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Yale University Press, 2018. — 448 p. A compelling and original recovery of Native American resistance and adaptation to colonial America With rigorous original scholarship and creative narration, Lisa Brooks recovers a complex picture of war, captivity, and Native resistance during the “First Indian War” (later named King Philip’s War) by relaying the stories of Weetamoo, a...
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University of Minnesota Press, 2008. — 352 p. Literary critics frequently portray early Native American writers either as individuals caught between two worlds or as subjects who, even as they defied the colonial world, struggled to exist within it. In striking counterpoint to these analyses, Lisa Brooks demonstrates the ways in which Native leaders - including Samson Occom,...
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Mouton Publishers, 1980. — 496 р. The concept of this volume was to transcend traditionally preconceived boundaries thought appropriate for investigation, and to attempt to breed hybrid vigor by mixing a variety of approaches and directions of research together, drawing from regional areas circumscribing the Pacific. The last decade has seen a three- or four-fold increase in the...
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Open Road Media, 2012. - 482 p. First published in 1970, "Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee" generated shockwaves with its frank and heartbreaking depiction of the systematic annihilation of American Indian tribes across the western frontier. In this nonfiction account, Dee Brown focuses on the betrayals, battles, and massacres suffered by American Indians between 1860 and 1890. He...
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Open Road Media, 2012. — 244 p. Dee Brown's authoritative history of Fort Phil Kearney and the notorious Fetterman Massacre This dark, unflinching, and fascinating book is Dee Brown's riveting account of events leading up to the Battle of the Hundred Slain - the devastating 1866 conflict that pitted Lakota, Arapaho, and Northern Cheyenne warriors, including Oglala chief Red Cloud,...
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Athabasca University Press, 2017. — 360 p. n 1670, the ancient homeland of the Cree and Ojibwe people of Hudson Bay became known to the English entrepreneurs of the Hudson’s Bay Company as Rupert’s Land, after the founder and absentee landlord, Prince Rupert. For four decades, Jennifer S. H. Brown has examined the complex relationships that developed among the newcomers and the...
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Southern Publishers, 1938. — 570 p. The book's subtitle reveals the scope of Brown's interest, and from the opening Preface of Old Frontiers, Brown reveals his desire to correct the narrative of Cherokee history -- a history that for a century "used the language of the United States Government" to chronicle the plight of the Cherokees. Brown blamed white settlers and their desire...
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The History Press, 2010. — 192 p. On two chilly December days in 1763, bands of armed men raged through camps of peaceful Conestoga Indians. They killed twenty women, children and men, effectively wiping out the tribe. These murderous rampages by Lancaster County's Paxton Boys were the culminating tragedies in a series of traded atrocities between European settlers and native...
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Open Book Publishers, 2013. — 220 p. The Quechan people live along the lower part of the Colorado River in the United States. According to tradition, the Quechan and other Yuman people were created at the beginning of time, and their Creation myth explains how they came into existence, the origin of their environment, and the significance of their oldest traditions. The Creation...
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University of Utah Press, 2018. — 288 p. In this autobiography, Viola Burnette braids the history of the Lakota people with the story of her own life as an Iyeska, or mixed-race Indian. Bringing together her years growing up on a reservation, her work as a lawyer and legal advocate for Native peoples, and her woman’s perspective, she draws the reader into an intelligent and...
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University of Utah Press, 2018. — 288 p. In this autobiography, Viola Burnette braids the history of the Lakota people with the story of her own life as an Iyeska, or mixed-race Indian. Bringing together her years growing up on a reservation, her work as a lawyer and legal advocate for Native peoples, and her woman’s perspective, she draws the reader into an intelligent and...
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  • 2,50 МБ
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University Alabama Press, 2004. — 592 p. (2nd revised edition) Osage traditional lands are located in mid-continental America encompassed by the present-day states of Arkansas, Missouri, Kansas, and Oklahoma. Major waterways through these lands and the defensible terrain of the Ozark range provided the tribe a distinct advantage in prehistoric and early historic times. A...
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University Press of New England, 1991. — 312 p. Colin G. Calloway collects, for the first time, documents describing the full range of encounters of Indians and Europeans in northern New England during the Colonial era. His comprehensive and highly readable introduction to the subject of Indian and European interaction in northern New England covers early encounters, missionary...
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Bedford / St. Martin's Press, 1996. — 226 p. This unique anthology chronicles the Plains Indians' struggle to maintain their traditional way of life in the changing world of the nineteenth century. Its rich variety of 34 primary sources - including narratives, myths, speeches, and transcribed oral histories - gives students the rare opportunity to view the transformation of the...
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University Press of New England, 1997. — 278 p. The 1676 killing of Metacomet, the tribal leader dubbed "King Philip" by colonists, is commonly seen as a watershed event, marking the end of a bloody war, dissolution of Indian society in New England, and even the disappearance of Native peoples from the region. This collection challenges that assumption, showing that Indians...
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University of Oklahoma Press, 1987. — 360 p. Thus did a white captive of the Indians summarize Indian-white relations on the North American frontier early in the nineteenth century. Colin G. Calloway maintains, however, that the British, far from scorning and neglecting Indians, cultivated and observed them closely in the period 1783 to 1815. He shows that the stereotype of the...
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5th Edition. — Bedford / St. Martin's, 2016. — 692 p. — ISBN 978-1-4576-9624-4. First Peoples ’ distinctive approach continues to make it the bestselling and most highly acclaimed text for the American Indian history survey. Respected scholar Colin G. Calloway provides a solid foundation grounded in timely scholarship and a narrative that brings a largely untold history to...
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6th Edition — Bedford/St. Martin's, 2018. — 704 p. Expertly authored by Colin G. Calloway, First Peoples has been praised for its inclusion of Native American sources and Calloway's concerted effort to weave Native perspectives throughout the narrative. Emphasizing the importance of primary sources, each chapter includes a document project and picture essay organized around...
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Johns Hopkins University Press, 1998. — 256 p. Although many Americans consider the establishment of the colonies as the birth of this country, in fact Early America already existed long before the arrival of the Europeans. From coast to coast, Native Americans had created enduring cultures, and the subsequent European invasion remade much of the existing land and culture. In New...
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University Press of New England, 1992. — 176 p. Revealing firsthand narratives of Indian captivity from eighteenth-century New Hampshire and Vermont. Narratives of Europeans who experienced Indian captivity represent one of the oldest genres of American literature. They are often credited with establishing the stereotype of Indians as cruel and bloodthirsty. While early southern...
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University of Nebraska Press, 2003. — 631 p. This magnificent, sweeping work traces the histories of the Native peoples of the American West from their arrival thousands of years ago to the early years of the nineteenth century. Emphasizing conflict and change, One Vast Winter Count offers a new look at the early history of the region by blending ethnohistory, colonial history,...
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Oxford University Press, 2013. — 400 p. Indian peoples made some four hundred treaties with the United States between the American Revolution and 1871, when Congress prohibited them. They signed nine treaties with the Confederacy, as well as countless others over the centuries with Spain, France, Britain, Mexico, the Republic of Texas, Canada, and even Russia, not to mention...
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Oxford University Press, 2013. — 400 p. Indian peoples made some four hundred treaties with the United States between the American Revolution and 1871, when Congress prohibited them. They signed nine treaties with the Confederacy, as well as countless others over the centuries with Spain, France, Britain, Mexico, the Republic of Texas, Canada, and even Russia, not to mention...
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Cambridge University Press, 1995. — 354 p. This study presents the first broad coverage of Indian experiences in the American Revolution rather than Indian participation as allies or enemies of contending parties. Colin Calloway focuses on eight Indian communities as he explores how the Revolution often translated into war among Indians and their own struggles for independence....
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Dartmouth College Press, 2010. — 280 p. Dartmouth College began life as an Indian school, a pretense that has since been abandoned. Still, the institution has a unique, if complicated, relationship with Native Americans and their history. Beginning with Samson Occom's role as the first "development officer" of the college, Colin G. Calloway tells the entire, complex story of...
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Oxford University Press, 2018. — 640 p. In this sweeping new biography, Colin Calloway uses the prism of George Washington's life to bring focus to the great Native leaders of his time - Shingas, Tanaghrisson, Bloody Fellow, Joseph Brant, Red Jacket, Little Turtle - and the tribes they represented: the Iroquois Confederacy, Lenape, Miami, Creek, Delaware; in the process, he...
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Oxford University Press, 2018. — 640 p. In this sweeping new biography, Colin Calloway uses the prism of George Washington's life to bring focus to the great Native leaders of his time - Shingas, Tanaghrisson, Bloody Fellow, Joseph Brant, Red Jacket, Little Turtle - and the tribes they represented: the Iroquois Confederacy, Lenape, Miami, Creek, Delaware; in the process, he...
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Oxford University Press, 2014. — 224 p. In 1791, General Arthur St. Clair led the United States army in a campaign to destroy a complex of Indian villages at the Maumee River in northwestern Ohio. Almost within reach of their objective, St. Clair's 1,400 men were attacked by about one thousand Indians. The U.S. force was decimated, suffering nearly one thousand casualties in...
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University of Oklahoma Press;, 1994. — 372 p. Before European incursions began in the seventeenth century, the Western Abenaki Indians inhabited present-day Vermont and New Hampshire, particularly the Lake Champlain and Connecticut River valleys. This history of their coexistence and conflicts with whites on the northern New England frontier documents their survival as a...
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Palgrave Macmillan, 1994. — 208 p. This unique collection presents Native American perspectives on the events of the colonial era, from the first encounters between Indians and Europeans in the early seventeenth century through the American Revolution in the late eighteenth century. The documents collected here are drawn from letters, speeches, and records of treaty negotiations...
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Oxford University Press, 2008. — 392 p. In nineteenth century paintings, the proud Indian warrior and the Scottish Highland chief appear in similar ways - colorful and wild, righteous and warlike, the last of their kind. Earlier accounts depict both as barbarians, lacking in culture and in need of civilization. By the nineteenth century, intermarriage and cultural contact between...
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University of British Columbia Press, 2018. — 224 p. As the nineteenth century ended, Ontario wildlife became increasingly valuable. Tourists and sport hunters spent growing amounts of money in search of game, and the government began to extend and exert its regulatory powers in this arena. Restrictions were also imposed on hunting and trapping, completely ignoring Anishinaabeg...
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Williamsburg, VA: Omohundro Institute of Early American History and Culture ; Chapel Hill, NC: University of North Carolina Press, 2019. — xiv, 456 p. : 22 illus., 2 maps. Taking a fresh look at the first two centuries of French colonialism in the Americas, this book answers the long-standing question of how and how well Indigenous Americans and the Europeans who arrived on their...
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Fernwood Publishing, 2018. — 200 p. During the 60s Scoop, over 20,000 Indigenous children in Canada were removed from their biological families, lands and culture and trafficked across provinces, borders and overseas to be raised in non-Indigenous households. Ohpikiihaakan-ohpihmeh delves into the personal and provocative narrative of Colleen Cardinal’s journey growing up in a...
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McGill-Queen's University Press, 1993. — 352 p. Despite repeated requests for assistance from Plains Indians, the Canadian government provided very little help between 1874 and 1885, and what little they did give proved useless. Although drought, frost, and other natural phenomena contributed to the failure of early efforts, reserve farmers were determined to create an economy...
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Athabasca University Press, 2010. — 260 p. — ISBN10 1897425821 ISBN13 9781897425824. "Recollecting" is a rich collection of essays that illuminate the lives of late eighteenth century to the mid-twentieth century Aboriginal women, who have been overlooked in sweeping narratives of the history of the West. Some essays focus on individual women - a trader, a performer, a non-human...
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University of New Mexico Press, 1997. — 308 p. This volume, the first in the New American West Series edited by Elliott West, explores Alaska's vast national-park system and the evolution of wilderness concepts in the twentieth century. After World War II, Alaska's traditional Eskimos, Indians, and whites still trapped, hunted, and fished in the forests. Their presence challenged...
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Praeger, 2011. — 216 p. This in-depth narrative history of the interactions between English settlers and American Indians during the Virginia colony’s first century explains why a harmonious coexistence proved impossible. While the romanticized story of the Jamestown colony has been retold many times, the events following the marriage of Pocahontas and John Rolfe are less well...
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Praeger, 2017. — 241 p. — (Native America: Yesterday and Today). Early in his career as an Indian fighter, American Indians gave Andrew Jackson a name - Sharp Knife - that evoked their sense of his ruthlessness and cruelty. Contrary to popular belief - and to many textbook accounts - in 1830, Congress did not authorize the forcible seizure of Indian land and the deportation of the...
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University of Massachusetts Press, 1996. — 232 p. This book offers the first full-scale analysis of the Pequot War (1636-37), a pivotal event in New England colonial history. Through an innovative rereading of the Puritan sources, Alfred A. Cave refutes claims that settlers acted defensively to counter a Pequot conspiracy to exterminate Europeans. Drawing on archaeological,...
  • №102
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University of Nebraska Press, 2006. — 328 p. "Prophets of the Great Spirit" offers an in-depth look at the work of a diverse group of Native American visionaries who forged new, syncretic religious movements that provided their peoples with the ideological means to resist white domination. By blending ideas borrowed from Christianity with traditional beliefs, they transformed...
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The Arthur H. Clark Company, 2012. — 408 p. They called themselves Dakota, but the explorers and fur traders who first encountered these people in the sixteenth century referred to them as Sioux, a corruption of the name their enemies called them. That linguistic dissonance foreshadowed a series of bloodier conflicts between Sioux warriors and the American military in the...
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University of Oklahoma Press, 1989. — 440 p. The first major battle between the U.S. Army and the Cheyenne Indians took place on the south fork of the Solomon River in present-day northwest Kansas. In this stirring account, William Y. Chalfant recreates the human dimensions of what was probably the only large-unit sabre charge against the Plains tribes, in a battle that was as...
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Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 1997. — 231 p. Cheyennes at Dark Water Creek tells the tragic story of the southern bands of Cheyennes from the period following the Treaty of Medicine Lodge through the battles and skirmishes known as the Red River War. The Battle of Sappa Creek, the last encounter of that conflict, was a fight between a band of Cheyennes and a company of the...
  • №106
  • 41,01 МБ
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Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 1997. — 231 p. Cheyennes at Dark Water Creek tells the tragic story of the southern bands of Cheyennes from the period following the Treaty of Medicine Lodge through the battles and skirmishes known as the Red River War. The Battle of Sappa Creek, the last encounter of that conflict, was a fight between a band of Cheyennes and a company of the...
  • №107
  • 1,80 МБ
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Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 1991. — 184 p. "Without Quarter" is the story of the first major U.S. army expedition against the Comanches between the Mexican and Civil wars. Late in 1858, under the leadership of Captain (Brevet Major) Earl Van Dorn, units of the Second Cavalry marched north form Fort Belknap, Texas, and established a temporary post, Camp Radziminski, at...
  • №108
  • 1006,36 КБ
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The University of North Carolina Press, 2010. — 308 p. — ISBN-10 0807871060; ISBN-13: 978-0807871065. The Color of the Land brings the histories of Creek Indians, African Americans, and whites in Oklahoma together into one story that explores the way races and nations were made and remade in conflicts over who would own land, who would farm it, and who would rule it. This story...
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  • 4,03 МБ
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CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform, 2016. — 74 p. The Red River War of 1874-1875: The History of the Last American Campaign to Remove Native Americans from the Southwest comprehensively covers the climactic clashes between the two sides. Along with pictures of important people, places, and events, you will learn about the Red River War like never before.
  • №110
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Utah State University Press, 1999. — 272 p. The Northwestern Shoshone knew as home the northern Great Salt Lake, Bear River, Cache, and Bear Lake valleys-northern Utah. Sagwitch was born at a time when his people traded with the mountain men. In the late 1850s, wagons brought Mormon farmers to settle in Cache Valley, the Northwestern Shoshone heartland. Emigrants and settlers...
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Lincoln, NE: University of Nebraska Press, 2012. — 152 p. In the days following the Battle of Birch Coulie, the decisive battle in the deadly Dakota War of 1862, one of President Lincoln’s private secretaries wrote: “There has hardly been an outbreak so treacherous, so sudden, so bitter, and so bloody, as that which filled the State of Minnesota with sorrow and lamentation.” Even...
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New York: Routledge, 2003. — 506 p. A book about the condition of Native North America. From page xvi: «Plainly, there are choices to be made. Arriving at the right choices, however, depends to a considerable extent upon being able to see things clearly. Acts of Rebellion , then, although it is a reader, and therefore by both intent and design far from comprehensive, is meant...
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2nd edition — City Lights Publishers, 2002. — 460 p. This seminal book established Churchill as an intellectual force to be reckoned with in indigenous land rights debates. Required reading for anyone interested in Native North America and ecological justice. Revised and expanded edition. Ward Churchill (Keetowah Cherokee) has achieved an unparalleled reputation as a...
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University of Arizona Press, 2013. — 216 p. Histories of New England typically frame the region’s Indigenous populations in terms of effects felt from European colonialism: the ravages of epidemics and warfare, the restrictions of reservation life, and the influences of European-introduced ideas, customs, and materials. Much less attention is given to how Algonquian peoples...
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University Press of Colorado, 2018. — 440 p. The Great Plains has been central to academic and popular visions of Native American warfare, largely because the region’s well-documented violence was so central to the expansion of Euroamerican settlement. However, social violence has deep roots on the Plains beyond this post-Contact perception, and these roots have not been...
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University Press of Colorado, 2018. — 440 p. The Great Plains has been central to academic and popular visions of Native American warfare, largely because the region’s well-documented violence was so central to the expansion of Euroamerican settlement. However, social violence has deep roots on the Plains beyond this post-Contact perception, and these roots have not been...
  • №117
  • 6,23 МБ
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University of Nebraska Press, 1988. — 152 p. The Killing of Chief Crazy Horse is a story of envy, greed, and treachery. In the year after the Battle of the Little Big Horn, Crazy Horse and his half-starved followers finally surrendered to the U.S. Army near Camp Robinson, Nebraska. The reverberations of that event led to the death of the great Oglala Sioux chief in the fall of...
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University of Oklahoma Press, 2003. — 166 p. Here is the gripping story of the last stand of Chief Philip Bowles of the Chickamauga Cherokee Indians of Texas. Mary Whatley Clarke sets this tale against the stormy background of Anglo-Cherokee-Mexican relations in early nineteenth-century Texas. The Chickamauga Cherokees from Running Water on the Tennessee River were continually...
  • №119
  • 10,89 МБ
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Iowa City, IA: University of Iowa Press, 2019. — 272 p. , figs. , photos. — (Iowa and the Midwest Experience Series). Robert Hopkins was a man caught between two worlds. As a member of the Dakota Nation, he was unfairly imprisoned, accused of taking up arms against U.S. soldiers when war broke out with the Dakota in 1862. However, as a Christian convert who was also a preacher,...
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University of Iowa Press, 2019. — 272 p. Robert Hopkins was a man caught between two worlds. As a member of the Dakota Nation, he was unfairly imprisoned, accused of taking up arms against U.S. soldiers when war broke out with the Dakota in 1862. However, as a Christian convert who was also a preacher, Hopkins’s allegiance was often questioned by many of his fellow Dakota as well....
  • №121
  • 13,63 МБ
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Jefferson, NC: McFarland & Company, Inc. Publishers, 2005. — xii, 267 p. : ill., maps Detailed and well-documented...an important contribution --The Journal of American History Contains a detailed analysis of the politics, strategy, and tactics of the campaign --C&RL News As the United States fought the Civil War in the early 1860s, the country's western frontier was...
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  • 17,22 МБ
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University Alabama Press, 2003. — 272 p. This is the first comprehensive analysis of the partial replacement of flaked stone and ground stone traditions by metal tools in the Americas during the Contact Era. It examines the functional, symbolic, and economic consequences of that replacement on the lifeways of native populations, even as lithic technologies persisted well after the...
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The University of North Carolina Press, 2015. — 316 p. In this wide-ranging and carefully curated anthology, Daniel M. Cobb presents the words of Indigenous people who have shaped Native American rights movements from the late nineteenth century through the present day. Presenting essays, letters, interviews, speeches, government documents, and other testimony, Cobb shows how...
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  • 4,79 МБ
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University Of Minnesota Press, 2018. — 280 p. Through the words of long-ago witnesses, Gichi Bitobig, Grand Marais recovers the overlooked Anishinaabeg roots and corporate origins of Grand Marais, a history more complex than is often told. It recalls a time in northern Minnesota when men of the American Fur Company and the Anishinaabeg navigated the shifting course of progress,...
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  • 4,99 МБ
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University of Oklahoma Press, 1988. — 352 p. This is the first biography of Chief Left Hand, diplomat, linguist, and legendary of the Plains Indians. Working from government reports, manuscripts, and the diaries and letters of those persons - both white and Indian - who knew him, Margaret Coel has developed an unusually readable, interesting, and closely documented account of his...
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  • 3,25 МБ
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Harvard University Press, 1999. — 352 p. No previous work on John Eliot's mission to the Indians has told such a comprehensive and engaging story. Richard Cogley takes a dual approach: he delves deeply into Eliot's theological writings and describes the historical development of Eliot's missionary work. By relating the two, he presents fresh perspectives that challenge widely...
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  • 2,06 МБ
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Military Studies Press, 2012. — 144 p. The genesis for the publication of The Cheyenne Wars Atlas goes back to June 1992. It was then that the Combat Studies Institute (CSI) conducted the first Sioux Wars Staff Ride for Brigadier General William M. Steele, Deputy Commandant of the US Army Command and General Staff College (CGSC). The next year, CSI expanded the staff ride into a...
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University of Oklahoma Press, 1999. — 304 p. In "An Apache Nightmare", Charles Collins tells the story of the Battle at Cibecue Creek, a pivotal event in the Apache Wars. On August 28, 1881, Col. Eugene Asa Carr left Fort Apache, Arizona Territory, with two cavalry troops and a company of Indian scouts. Their aim was to arrest a Cibecue Apache medicine man,...
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University of California Press, 1996. — 328 p. From about 1830 to 1849, Bent's Old Fort, located in present-day Colorado on the Mountain Branch of the Santa Fe Trail, was the largest trading post in the Southwest and the mountain-plains region. Although the raw enterprise and improvisation that characterized the American westward movement seem to have little to do with ritual,...
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  • 25,73 МБ
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AU Press, Athabasca University, 2015. — 280 p. In 1990, the Glenbow Museum took its first tentative steps toward repatriation by returning sacred objects to First Nations' peoples. These efforts drew harsh criticism from members of the provincial government. Was it not the museum's primary legal, ethical, and fiduciary responsibility to ensure the physical preservation of its...
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  • 23,07 МБ
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University of Oklahoma Press, 1967. — 368 p. The Creek Frontier, 1540–1783 is the first complete history of an American Indian tribe in the colonial period. Although much has been written of the Spanish, French, and British explorations in North America in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, little has been known of the Indian tribes that explorers such as De Soto and De Luna...
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  • 45,86 МБ
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McGill-Queen's University Press, 2018. — 318 p. Indigenous Nationals/Canadian Citizens begins with a detailed policy history from first contact to the Sesquicentennial with major emphasis on the evolution of Canadian policy initiatives relating to Indigenous peoples. This is followed by a focus on the key Supreme Court decisions that have dramatically enhanced Indigenous peoples'...
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  • 6,27 МБ
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University Press of Florida, 1993. — 379 p. The history of the Seminole Indians in Florida embodies a vital part of the tragic history of native and white American conflict throughout the entire United States. Drawing on widely scattered scholarship, including the oldest documents and recently discovered material, Covington gives us a complete account of the Florida Seminoles from...
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University Press of Florida, 1993. — 379 p. The history of the Seminole Indians in Florida embodies a vital part of the tragic history of native and white American conflict throughout the entire United States. Drawing on widely scattered scholarship, including the oldest documents and recently discovered material, Covington gives us a complete account of the Florida Seminoles from...
  • №135
  • 3,11 МБ
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New York: Knopf, 2016. — 544 p. — ISBN-10: 0307958043; ISBN-13: 9780307958044. A magisterial, essential history of the struggle between whites and Native Americans over the fate of the West. Cover. Also by Peter Cozzens. Title page. Dedication. Epigraph. List of maps. Chronology. Prologue. Part one. Part two. Part three. Part four. Acknowledgments. Notes. Bibliography....
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  • 50,10 МБ
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Stackpole Books, 2003. — 848 p. "Eyewitnesses to the Indian Wars, 1865-1890: Conquering the Southern Plain"s is the third in a planned five-volume series that will tell the saga of the military struggle for the American West in the words of the soldiers, noncombatants, and Native Americans who shaped it. "Volume 3: Conquering the Southern Plains" offers as complete a selection of...
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  • 12,24 МБ
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Stackpole Books, 2004. — 554 p. This is the final installment of a series that seeks to tell the saga of the military struggle for the American West, using the words of the soldiers, noncombatants, and Native Americans who shaped it. Topics include army life on the frontier, Indian scouts, women's experiences, and commanders and their campaigns. To paint as broad and colorful a...
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  • 12,45 МБ
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Stackpole Books, 2004. — 686 p. This is the fourth in a planned five-volume series that seeks to tell the saga of the military struggle for the American West, using the words of the soldiers, noncombatants, and Native Americans who shaped it. To paint as broad and colorful a picture as possible, riveting firsthand materials have been carefully selected from contemporaneous...
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Mechanicsburg, PA: Stackpole Books, 2001. — (1st. ed.) — 736 p.; ill., maps. Eyewitnesses to the Indian Wars, 1865–1890: The Struggle for Apacheria is the first in a five-volume series telling the saga of the military struggle for the American West in the words of the soldiers, noncombatants, and Native Americans who shaped it. This first volume presents a selection of outstanding...
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Stackpole Books, 2002. — 736 p. "Eyewitnesses to the Indian Wars, 1865-1890: The Wars for the Pacific Northwest" is the second in a planned five-volume series that will tell the saga of the military struggle for the American West in the words of the soldiers, noncombatants, and Native Americans who shaped it. Patterned after the classic Battles and Leaders of the Civil War, the...
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Alfred A. Knopf, a division of Penguin Random House LLC, 2016. — 562 p. With the end of the Civil War, the nation recommenced its expansion onto traditional Indian tribal lands, setting off a wide-ranging conflict that would last more than three decades. In an exploration of the wars and negotiations that destroyed tribal ways of life even as they made possible the emergence of...
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University of Massachusetts Press, 2014. — 224 p. In May 1725, during a three-year conflict between English colonists and the Eastern Abenaki Nation, a thirty-four-man expedition led by Captain John Lovewell set out to ambush their adversaries, acquire some scalp bounties, and hasten the end of the war. Instead, the Abenakis staged a surprise attack of their own at Pigwacket,...
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Fernwood Books, 2018. — 192 p. In recent years, Indigenous peoples have lead a number of high profile movements fighting for social and environmental justice in Canada. From land struggles to struggles against resource extraction, pipeline development and fracking, land and water defenders have created a national discussion about these issues and successfully slowed the rate of...
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University of Utah Press, 1994. — 252 p. A hundred forty years ago, the Western Shoshone occupied a vast area of present-day Nevada—from Idaho in the north to Death Valley in the south. Today, the Newe hold a fraction of their former territory, still practicing native lifeways while accepting many aspect of American culture. Their story deserves telling. The Road on Which We Came...
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University of Utah Press, 1994. — 252 p. A hundred forty years ago, the Western Shoshone occupied a vast area of present-day Nevada—from Idaho in the north to Death Valley in the south. Today, the Newe hold a fraction of their former territory, still practicing native lifeways while accepting many aspect of American culture. Their story deserves telling. The Road on Which We Came...
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Ten Speed Press, 1983. — 221 p. Text, drawings, and photographs describe the life of the Salish Indians and other North American tribes before the arrival of white settlers.
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Nimbus Publishing, 2016. — 248 p. When New Brunswick became its own colony in 1784, the government concluded several peace treaties with the Mi'kmaq and Maliseet in the territory that protected First Nations lands. But as settlers, loyalists, and disbanded soldiers moved into New Brunswick, they moved onto the reserves, often without official sanction. This squatter problem led...
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Nimbus Publishing, 2016. — 248 p. When New Brunswick became its own colony in 1784, the government concluded several peace treaties with the Mi'kmaq and Maliseet in the territory that protected First Nations lands. But as settlers, loyalists, and disbanded soldiers moved into New Brunswick, they moved onto the reserves, often without official sanction. This squatter problem led...
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University of Oklahoma Press, 1997. — 264 p. In the dawn of November 29, 1864, a Colorado militia unit attacked a peaceful encampment of Cheyenne Indians by Sand Creek in southeast Colorado Territory and murdered almost two hundred men, women, and children. In The Massacre at Sand Creek, Bruce Cutler retells, in a powerful narrative, the events surrounding this atrocity. We...
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University of Oklahoma Press, 1997. — 264 p. In the dawn of November 29, 1864, a Colorado militia unit attacked a peaceful encampment of Cheyenne Indians by Sand Creek in southeast Colorado Territory and murdered almost two hundred men, women, and children. In The Massacre at Sand Creek, Bruce Cutler retells, in a powerful narrative, the events surrounding this atrocity. We...
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University of Regina Press, 2013. — 334 p. In arresting, but harrowing, prose, James Daschuk examines the roles that Old World diseases, climate, and, most disturbingly, Canadian politics — the politics of ethnocide — played in the deaths and subjugation of thousands of aboriginal people in the realization of Sir John A. Macdonald’s “National Dream.” It was a dream that came at...
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University of Regina Press, 2013. — 334 p. In arresting, but harrowing, prose, James Daschuk examines the roles that Old World diseases, climate, and, most disturbingly, Canadian politics — the politics of ethnocide — played in the deaths and subjugation of thousands of aboriginal people in the realization of Sir John A. Macdonald’s “National Dream.” It was a dream that came at...
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University of Nebraska Press, 2001. — 346 p. An indispensable introduction to the rich variety of Native leadership in the modern era, "The New Warriors" profiles Native men and women who have played a significant role in the affairs of their communities and of the nation over the course of the twentieth century. The leaders showcased include the early-twentieth-century writer and...
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University of Oklahoma Press, 2014. — 304 p. This is the saga of the Fox (or Mesquakie) Indians' struggle to maintain their identity in the face of colonial New France during the late seventeenth and early eighteenth centuries. The Foxes occupied central Wisconsin, where for a long time they had warred with the Sioux and, more recently, had opposed the extension of the French...
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University of Oklahoma Press, 2014. — 304 p. This is the saga of the Fox (or Mesquakie) Indians' struggle to maintain their identity in the face of colonial New France during the late seventeenth and early eighteenth centuries. The Foxes occupied central Wisconsin, where for a long time they had warred with the Sioux and, more recently, had opposed the extension of the French...
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University of Oklahoma Press, 1987. — 384 p. The Potawatomi Indians were the dominant tribe in the region of Wisconsin, Illinois, Indiana, and southern Michigan during the seventeenth and early eighteenth centuries. Active participants in the fur trade, and close friends with many French fur traders and government leaders, the Potawatomis remained loyal to New France throughout...
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University of Oklahoma Press, 1987. — 384 p. The Potawatomi Indians were the dominant tribe in the region of Wisconsin, Illinois, Indiana, and southern Michigan during the seventeenth and early eighteenth centuries. Active participants in the fur trade, and close friends with many French fur traders and government leaders, the Potawatomis remained loyal to New France throughout...
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University of Utah Press, 2016. — 288 p. Translating professional archaeological research into meaningful and thoughtful educational experiences for the public has taken on increased urgency in recent years. This book presents eight case studies by professional archaeologists who discuss innovative approaches and advances in research methodology while examining the myriad...
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University of Massachusetts Press, 2016. — 270 p. Throughout the nineteenth century, Native and non-Native women writers protested U.S. government actions that threatened indigenous people’s existence. The conventional genres they sometimes adopted - the sensationalistic captivity narrative, sentimental Indian lament poetry, didactic assimilation fiction, and the mass-circulated...
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University of Oklahoma Press, 1984. — 464 p. In 1906 when the Creek Indian Chitto Harjo was protesting the United States government's liquidation of his tribe's lands, he began his argument with an account of Indian history from the time of Columbus, "for, of course, a thing has to have a root before it can grow." Yet even today most intelligent non-Indian Americans have...
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University of British Columbia Press, 1995. — 414 p. ‘A strange and gripping tragedy’ is how Brian Moore has described the seventeenth-century confrontation of Europeans and Amerindians in his compelling novel, Black Robe. In Bitter Feast , sociologist an dhistorian Denys Delage takes a fresh look at the struggle underlying the meeting of two civilizations on the North American...
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Yale University Press, 2009. — 496 p. In the early 1830s, after decades of relative peace, northern Mexicans and the Indians whom they called “the barbarians” descended into a terrifying cycle of violence. For the next fifteen years, owing in part to changes unleashed by American expansion, Indian warriors launched devastating attacks across ten Mexican states. Raids and...
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Fulcrum Publishing, 2012. — 176 p. The Pacific Northwest was one of the most populated and prosperous regions for Native Americans before the coming of the white man. By the mid-1800s, measles and smallpox decimated the Indian population, and the remaining tribes were forced to give up their ancestral lands. Vine Deloria Jr. tells the story of these tribes’ fight for survival, one...
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University of Oklahoma Press, 1988. — 296 p. Custer Died for Your Sins: An Indian Manifesto (first published in 1969), is non-fiction book by the lawyer, professor and writer Vine Deloria, Jr. In his new preface to this new edition, the author observes, "The Indian world has changed so substantially since the first publication of this book that some things contained in it seem new...
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University of Oklahoma Press, 1988. — 296 p. Custer Died for Your Sins: An Indian Manifesto (first published in 1969), is non-fiction book by the lawyer, professor and writer Vine Deloria, Jr. In his new preface to this new edition, the author observes, "The Indian world has changed so substantially since the first publication of this book that some things contained in it seem new...
  • №166
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Fulcrum Publishing, 1997. — 288 p. Vine Deloria, Jr., leading Native American scholar and author of the best-selling God is Red , addresses the conflict between mainstream scientific theory about our world and the ancestral worldview of Native Americans. Claiming that science has created a largely fictional scenario for American Indians in prehistoric North America, Deloria offers...
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Wiley-Blackwell, 2002. — 515 p. A Companion to American Indian History captures the thematic breadth of Native American history. Twenty-five original essays written by leading scholars, both American Indian and non-American Indian, bring a comprehensive perspective to a history that in the past has been related exclusively by Euro-Americans. The essays cover a wide range of...
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Yale University Press, 2018. — 496 p. Noted historian Christine DeLucia offers a major reconsideration of the violent seventeenth-century conflict in northeastern America known as King Philip’s War, providing an alternative to Pilgrim-centric narratives that have conventionally dominated the histories of colonial New England. DeLucia grounds her study of one of the most...
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Yale University Press, 2018. — 496 p. Noted historian Christine DeLucia offers a major reconsideration of the violent seventeenth-century conflict in northeastern America known as King Philip’s War, providing an alternative to Pilgrim-centric narratives that have conventionally dominated the histories of colonial New England. DeLucia grounds her study of one of the most...
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University of Nebraska Press, 2017. — 728 p. "A Fur Trader on the Upper Missouri" offers the first annotated scholarly edition of Jean-Baptiste Truteau's journal of his voyage on the Missouri River in the central and northern Plains from 1794 to 1796 and of his description of the upper Missouri. This fully modern and magisterial edition of this essential journal surpasses all...
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University of Oklahoma Press, 1989. — 226 p. Crowfoot, a Blood Indian who became chief of the Blackfoot Nation, was a great warrior and peacemaker during the time of settlement of the Canadian West. In one shattering decade, from 1875 to 1885, the great buffalo herds disappeared from Western Canada, forcing the Plains Indians who had depended on them for food, shelter, and...
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Heritage House Publishing, 2010. — 240 p. As a leader, Maskepetoon was respected for his skill as a hunter, his generosity and his wisdom. He was considered a “lucky” chief, a man who found buffalo on the edge of the plains, who avoided unnecessary conflicts with enemies but protected his camp like a mother grizzly her cubs. And in the turbulent mid-1800s, that’s exactly the kind...
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University of Nebraska Press, 2005. — 304 p. By focusing on the complex cultural and political facets of Native resistance to encroachment on reservation lands during the eighteenth century in southern New England, Beyond Conquest reconceptualizes indigenous histories and debates over Native land rights. As Amy E. Den Ouden demonstrates, Mohegans, Pequots, and Niantics living on...
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University of North Carolina Press, 2013. — 376 p. This engaging collection surveys and clarifies the complex issue of federal and state recognition for Native American tribal nations in the United States. Den Ouden and O'Brien gather focused and teachable essays on key topics, debates, and case studies. Written by leading scholars in the field, including historians,...
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University of South Carolina Press, 2017. — 256 p. "Patriots and Indians" examines relationships between elite South Carolinians and Native Americans through the colonial, Revolutionary, and early national periods. Eighteenth-century South Carolinians interacted with Indians in business and diplomatic affairs, as enemies and allies during times of war and less frequently in...
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University of Pennsylvania Press, 2012. — 328 p. Seneca Possessed examines the ordeal of a Native people in the wake of the American Revolution. As part of the once-formidable Iroquois Six Nations in western New York, Senecas occupied a significant if ambivalent place within the newly established United States. They found themselves the object of missionaries' conversion efforts...
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Oxford University Press, 2017. — 284 p. What do traditional Indigenous institutions of governance offer to our understanding of the contemporary challenges faced by the Navajo Nation today and tomorrow? Guided by the Mountains looks at the tensions between Indigenous political philosophy and the challenges faced by Indigenous nations in building political institutions that address...
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The University of Alberta Press, 1997. — 372 p. In The Myth of the Savage , Olive P. Dickason explores Europe's response to the richly varied spectrum of Amerindian societies during the late fifteenth, sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. Renaissance Europeans assessed New World information in the light of Christian orthodoxy and practical political ideology, using the concept of...
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University of Missouri Press, 2011. — 176 p. The Missouria people were the first American Indians encountered by European explorers venturing up the Pekitanoui River—the waterway we know as the Missouri. This Indian nation called itself the Nyut^achi, which translates to “People of the River Mouth,” and had been a dominant force in the Louisiana Territory of the pre-colonial era....
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Columbia, MO: University of Missouri Press, 2011. — (Missouri Heritage Reader Series). — 176 p. The Missouria people were the first American Indians encountered by European explorers venturing up the Pekitanoui River—the waterway we know as the Missouri. This Indian nation called itself the Nyut^achi, which translates to “People of the River Mouth,” and had been a dominant force...
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A SilverStowe Book, 2012. — 380 p. Burnt-Out Fires deals with a very dark period of American history, a period that, until recently, had been purposefully forgotten ... a period that hopefully will cause a re-evaluation of the American ideals and dreams. Everyone pointed to the Modocs as "model Indians." Living on the Oregon-California border, they had assimilated the American...
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University Press of Florida, 2011. — 140 p. Dress has always been a social medium. Color, fabric, and fit of clothing, along with adornments, posture, and manners, convey information on personal status, occupation, religious beliefs, and even sexual preferences. Clothing and adornment are therefore important not only for their utility but also in their expressive properties and...
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Doubleday, Page & Co., 1913. — 222 p. A century ago, a Philadelphia philanthropist sponsored a series of journeys to the American West to document Native American cultures and traditions. The Wanamaker Expeditions, conducted between 1908 and 1913, visited Crow Agency, Montana, near the site of the Battle of Little Bighorn. In words and images, the expeditions recorded aspects of...
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Doubleday, Page & Co., 1913. — 222 p. A century ago, a Philadelphia philanthropist sponsored a series of journeys to the American West to document Native American cultures and traditions. The Wanamaker Expeditions, conducted between 1908 and 1913, visited Crow Agency, Montana, near the site of the Battle of Little Bighorn. In words and images, the expeditions recorded aspects of...
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Doubleday, Page & Co., 1913. — 222 p. A century ago, a Philadelphia philanthropist sponsored a series of journeys to the American West to document Native American cultures and traditions. The Wanamaker Expeditions, conducted between 1908 and 1913, visited Crow Agency, Montana, near the site of the Battle of Little Bighorn. In words and images, the expeditions recorded aspects of...
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University of Oklahoma Press, 1963. — 382 p. The enlisted men in the United States Army during the Indian Wars (1866-91) need no longer be mere shadows behind their historically well-documented commanding officers. As member of the regular army, these men formed an important segment of our usually slighted national military continuum and, through their labors, combats, and...
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Little, Brown and Company, 2008. — 528 p. In June of 1876, on a desolate hill above a winding river called "the Little Bighorn", George Armstrong Custer and all 210 men under his direct command were annihilated by almost 2,000 Sioux and Cheyenne. The news of this devastating loss caused a public uproar, and those in positions of power promptly began to point fingers in order to...
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University of Regina Press, 2002. — 262 p. When the Dakota came to the Red River area in 1862, they brought with them their skills in hunting and gathering, fishing and farming. These bands faced common barriers, but responded to them differently. Some bands established themselves as commercial farmers, one band based its economy on the traditional pursuits of hunting, fishing and...
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University of Massachusetts Press, 1999. — 272 p. Sometimes described as "America's deadliest war," King Philip's War proved a critical turning point in the history of New England, leaving English colonists decisively in command of the region at the expense of native peoples. Although traditionally understood as an inevitable clash of cultures or as a classic example of conflict...
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Simon & Schuster, 2013. — 432 p. Red Cloud was the only American Indian in history to defeat the United States Army in a war, forcing the government to sue for peace on his terms. At the peak of Red Cloud’s powers the Sioux could claim control of one-fifth of the contiguous United States and the loyalty of thousands of fierce fighters. But the fog of history has left Red Cloud...
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Beacon Press, 2015. — 312 p. The first history of the United States told from the perspective of indigenous peoples Today in the United States, there are more than five hundred federally recognized Indigenous nations comprising nearly three million people, descendants of the fifteen million Native people who once inhabited this land. The centuries-long genocidal program of the US...
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Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 1987. — 316 p. In the decades following the Civil War, the principal task facing the United States Army was that of subduing the hostile western Indians and removing them from the path of white settlement. Indian scouts and auxiliaries played a central role in the effort, participating in virtually every campaign. In this comprehensive...
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University of Pennsylvania Press, 2007. — 336 p. In The Native Ground , Kathleen DuVal argues that it was Indians rather than European would-be colonizers who were more often able to determine the form and content of the relations between the two groups. Along the banks of the Arkansas and Mississippi rivers, far from Paris, Madrid, and London, European colonialism met neither...
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McGill-Queen's University Press, 1993. — 368 p. Since the 1950s the federal government has mounted a series of initiatives to address the social, economic, and political marginality of Canadian Natives. These initiatives have had a fundamental and often negative impact on Native communities, often as a result of the intense resistance they have generated. Dealing with these...
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McFarland, 2014. — 248 p. — ISBN-10 0786476389; ISBN-13 978-0786476381. This book, one of the first ever written on its subject, focuses on Russian America and American Alaska and their impact on the native population. From the closing years of the 17th century when the Russians first set foot on the shores of the far-flung Aleutian Islands, through the war years, to the...
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Speaker's Corner, 2010. — 576 p. The fate of Native Americans has been dependent in large part upon the recognition and enforcement of their legal, political, property, and cultural rights as indigenous peoples by American courts. Most people think that the goal of the judiciary, and especially the US Supreme Court, is to achieve universal notions of truth and justice. In this...
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Praeger, 2016. — 160 p. This academic compendium examines the complexities associated with Indian identity in North America, including the various social, political, and legal issues impacting Indian expression in different periods; the European influence on how self-governing tribal communities define the rights of citizenship within their own communities; and the effect of...
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Praeger, 2016. — 160 p. This academic compendium examines the complexities associated with Indian identity in North America, including the various social, political, and legal issues impacting Indian expression in different periods; the European influence on how self-governing tribal communities define the rights of citizenship within their own communities; and the effect of...
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University of Nebraska Press, 1983. — 272 p. In the early 1800s, when control of the Old Northwest had not yet been assured to the United States, the Shawnee leaders Tecumseh and his brother Tenskwatawa, the Shawnee Prophet, led an intertribal movement culminating at the Battle of Tippecanoe and the Battle of the Thames. Historians have portrayed Tecumseh, the war leader, as the...
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University Press of Kansas, 2018. — 232 p. The Osage empire, as most histories claim, was built by Osage men’s prowess at hunting and war. But, as Tai S. Edwards observes in Osage Women and Empire , Osage cosmology defined men and women as necessary pairs; in their society, hunting and war, like everything else, involved both men and women. Only by studying the gender roles of...
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Anchor Books Doubleday, 1988. — 424 p. A sixth-generation North Carolinian, highly-acclaimed author John Ehle grew up on former Cherokee hunting grounds. His experience as an accomplished novelist, combined with his extensive, meticulous research, culminates in this moving tragedy rich with historical detail. The Cherokee are a proud, ancient civilization. For hundreds of years...
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Anchor Books Doubleday, 1988. — 424 p. A sixth-generation North Carolinian, highly-acclaimed author John Ehle grew up on former Cherokee hunting grounds. His experience as an accomplished novelist, combined with his extensive, meticulous research, culminates in this moving tragedy rich with historical detail. The Cherokee are a proud, ancient civilization. For hundreds of years...
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University of Utah Press, 2012. — 320 p. The story of one of the longest-lived and most successful nomadic enclaves in North America provides a rare glimpse into the material expressions of Apache self-determination and survival. For nearly 200 years the Jicarilla Apache of New Mexico thrived in the interstices of Pueblo and Spanish settlements following their expulsion from...
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Zed Books Ltd., 2018. — 296 p. In 2016, the Lakota Sioux and their supporters came together at Standing Rock in defiance of attempts to build a major oil pipeline near their lands. What began as small-scale protest soon made headlines worldwide, with thousands - US army veterans among them - flocking to offer solidarity to their efforts. In an America mired by division and...
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University of Oklahoma Press, 2012. — 272 p. In previous accounts, the U.S. Army’s first clashes with the powerful Sioux tribe appear as a set of irrational events with a cast of improbable characters - a Mormon cow, a brash lieutenant, a drunken interpreter, an unfortunate Brulé chief, and an incorrigible army commander. R. Eli Paul shows instead that the events that precipitated...
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Michigan State University Press, 2013. — 256 p. In the past thirty years, the study of French-Indian relations in the center of North America has emerged as an important field for examining the complex relationships that defined a vast geographical area, including the Great Lakes region, the Illinois Country, the Missouri River Valley, and Upper and Lower Louisiana. For years, no...
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University of Toronto Press, 2015. — 704 p. "From New Peoples to New Nations" is a broad historical account of the emergence of the Metis as distinct peoples in North America over the last three hundred years. Examining the cultural, economic, and political strategies through which communities define their boundaries, Gerhard J. Ens and Joe Sawchuk trace the invention and...
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Guilford: TwoDot, 2015. — xv, 162 pages : illustrations. Historian Enss and Kanzanjian succeed in personalizing one of America’s most troubling memories, the brutal and unprovoked massacre of a sleeping village of Cheyenne and Arapaho peoples at Sand Creek (present-day Colorado) by troops of the Colorado Volunteers in November 1864. This still controversial military engagement...
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Random House, 1972. — 218 p. Pictures and descriptions of ceremonies and customs support an examination of the Plains Indians' struggle to preserve their identity, way of life, and environment.
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University of Oklahoma Press, 1991. — 312 p. The Franciscan letters and related documents, translated into English and published here for the first time, describe in detail the Pueblo Indian revolt of 1696 in New Mexico and the destruction of the Franciscan missions. The events are related by the missionaries themselves as they lived side by side with their Indian charges. The...
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Verso Books, 2019. — 320 p. In 2016, a small protest encampment at the Standing Rock Reservation in North Dakota, initially established to block construction of the Dakota Access oil pipeline, grew to be the largest Indigenous protest movement in the twenty-first century. Water Protectors knew this battle for native sovereignty had already been fought many times before, and that,...
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University of Nebraska Press, 2009. — 536 p. During the two centuries following European contact, the world of late prehistoric Mississippian chiefdoms collapsed and Native communities there fragmented, migrated, coalesced, and reorganized into new and often quite different societies. The editors of this volume, Robbie Ethridge and Sheri M. Shuck-Hall, argue that such a period and...
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University of Mississippi Press. 2008. — 408 p. The first two-hundred years of Western civilization in the Americas was a time when fundamental and sometimes catastrophic changes occurred in Native American communities in the South. In "The Transformation of the Southeastern Indians", historians, anthropologists, and archaeologists provide perspectives on how this era shaped...
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University of North Carolina Press, 2003. — 384 p. Reconstructing the human and natural environment of the Creek Indians in frontier Georgia, Mississippi, Alabama, and Tennessee, Robbie Ethridge illuminates a time of wrenching transition. "Creek Country" presents a compelling portrait of a culture in crisis, of its resiliency in the face of profound change, and of the forces that...
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The University of North Carolina Press, 2013. — 360 p. In this sweeping regional history, anthropologist Robbie Ethridge traces the metamorphosis of the Native South from first contact in 1540 to the dawn of the eighteenth century, when indigenous people no longer lived in a purely Indian world but rather on the edge of an expanding European empire. Using a framework that Ethridge...
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University of Oklahoma Press, 1995. — 192 p. In 1819 to 1820 several hundred Cherokees - led by Duwali, a chief from Tennessee - settled along the Sabine, Neches, and Angelina rivers in east Texas. Welcomed by Mexico as a buffer to U.S. settlement, Duwali’s people had separated from other Western Cherokees in an effort to retain the tribe’s traditional lifeways. As Dianne Everett...
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University of Oklahoma Press, 1968. — 240 p. The Plains Indian of the Upper Missouri in the nineteenth-century buffalo days remains the widely recognized symbol of primitive man par excellence - and the persistent image of the North American Indian at his most romantic. Fifteen cultural highlights, each a chapter made from research for a particular subject and enriched by...
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Oxford University Press, 1993. — 256 p. On August 25 1886, the Apache chief, Geronimo, surrendered to the US army, ending a long and bloody struggle. This book draws on fresh evidence to examine the ironies, dangers, and vicissitudes of that campaign. Based on the papers collected by Lt. Charles B. Gatewood — the one white man Geronimo trusted — including depositions from old...
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University of Nebraska Press, 1999. — 643 p. North American Indians have fired the imaginations of Europeans for the past five hundred years. The Native populations of North America have served a variety of European cultural and emotional needs, ranging from noble savage role models for Old World civilization to a more sympathetic portrayal as subjugated victims of American...
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London: Vintage Books, 2011. — 592 p. Authoritative and immediate, this is the classic account of the most powerful of the American Indian tribes. T.R. Fehrenbach traces the Comanches’ rise to power, from their prehistoric origins to their domination of the high plains for more than a century until their demise in the face of Anglo-American expansion. Master horseback riders...
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Hill and Wang Publ., 2015. — 480 p. Encounters at the Heart of the World concerns the Mandan Indians, iconic Plains people whose teeming, busy towns on the upper Missouri River were for centuries at the center of the North American universe. We know of them mostly because Lewis and Clark spent the winter of 1804-1805 with them, but why don't we know more? Who were they really? In...
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Hill and Wang Publ., 2015. — 480 p. Encounters at the Heart of the World concerns the Mandan Indians, iconic Plains people whose teeming, busy towns on the upper Missouri River were for centuries at the center of the North American universe. We know of them mostly because Lewis and Clark spent the winter of 1804-1805 with them, but why don't we know more? Who were they really? In...
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2nd edition — University of British Columbia Press, 1992. — 282 p. Originally published in 1977, "Contact and Conflict" has remained an important book, which has inspired numerous scholars to examine further the relationships between the Indians and the Europeans -- fur traders as well as settlers. For this edition, Robin Fisher has written a new introduction in which he surveys...
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ABC-CLIO, 2018. — 421 p. This book examines the treaties that promised self-government, financial assistance, cultural protections, and land to the more than 565 tribes of North America (including Alaska, Hawaii, and Canada). - Examines more than twenty primary source documents from treaties made between American Indians and the U.S. government between the late 18th and 19th...
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Greenwood Press, 2006. — 287 p. Preface Introduction Chronology Family, Women’s Roles, and Sexuality Economics, Rural, Urban, Taxation, Trade,and Transportation Language, Intellectual Life, Oral Tradition, and Education Material Life: Clothing, Food, Automobiles, and Housing Political Life, Professional Organization, Citizenship, Military Service, and Tribal Government...
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2nd edition — University of Toronto Press, 2000. — 256 p. When, in 1983, the first edition of "Riel and the Rebellion" was published, the scholarly controversy concerning Thomas Flanagan's interpretation of the Rebellion of 1885 escalated to one of national significance. One of the few books that presents a countervailing view to the traditional interpretation of the events of...
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State University of New York Press, 2004. — 366 p. At dawn on January 29, 1863, Union-affiliated troops under the command of Col. Patrick Connor were brought by Mormon guides to the banks of the Bear River, where, with the tacit approval of Abraham Lincoln, they attacked and slaughtered nearly three hundred Northwestern Shoshoni men, women, and children. Evidence suggests that, in...
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University of New Mexico Press, 2012. — 672 p. (Bilingual edition) Only two years after Coronado's expedition to what is now New Mexico, Spanish officials conducted an inquiry into the effects of the expedition on the native people Coronado encountered. The documents that record that investigation are at the heart of this book. These depositions are as fresh as today's news....
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Работа американского этнографа Тимоти Флинта посвящена военным столкновениям европейцев с индейцами Северной Америки, содержит в себе большое количество описаний и исторических фактов. Издана на английском языке в 1833 году в США.
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Arcadia Publishing Inc., 2016. — 176 p. Native Americans lived, hunted and farmed in east-central Indiana for two thousand years before the area became a part of the Hoosier State. Mounds and enclosures built by Adena and Hopewell peoples still stand near the White River and reflect their vibrant and mysterious cultures. The Lenape tribes moved to east-central Indiana many years...
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University of Illinois Press, 2011. — 272 p. The American Discovery of Europe investigates the voyages of America's Native peoples to the European continent before Columbus's 1492 arrival in the New World. The product of over twenty years of exhaustive research in libraries throughout Europe and the United States, the book presents a vast number of primary and secondary sources to...
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University of Illinois Press, 2011. — 272 p. The American Discovery of Europe investigates the voyages of America's Native peoples to the European continent before Columbus's 1492 arrival in the New World. The product of over twenty years of exhaustive research in libraries throughout Europe and the United States, the book presents a vast number of primary and secondary sources to...
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Few groups of people of comparable numbers have influenced the course of southwestern history as much as the native Amercans belonging to the Quechan (Yuma) Nation, For this reason alone the story of the Quechans and their neighbors of the Yuman family deserves telling.
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University of Nebraska Press, 1982. — 375 p. The Northern Arapahoes of the Wind River Reservation contradict many of the generalizations made about political change among native plains people. Loretta Fowler explores how, in response to the realities of domination by Americans, the Arapahoes have avoided serious factional divisions and have succeeded in legitimizing new authority...
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University of Oklahoma Press, 1997. — 416 p. On the afternoon of June 25, 1867, an overwhelming force of Sioux and Cheyenne Indians quickly mounted a savage onslaught against General George Armstrong Custer’s battalion, driving the doomed troopers of the U.S. Seventh Cavalry to a small hill overlooking the Little Bighorn River, where Custer and his men bravely erected their heroic...
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University of Oklahoma Press, 1997. — 416 p. On the afternoon of June 25, 1867, an overwhelming force of Sioux and Cheyenne Indians quickly mounted a savage onslaught against General George Armstrong Custer’s battalion, driving the doomed troopers of the U.S. Seventh Cavalry to a small hill overlooking the Little Bighorn River, where Custer and his men bravely erected their...
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University of Pennsylvania Press, 2012. — 264 p. "A Nation of Women" chronicles changing ideas of gender and identity among the Delaware Indians from the mid-seventeenth through the eighteenth century, as they encountered various waves of migrating peoples in their homelands along the eastern coast of North America. In Delaware society at the beginning of this period, to be a...
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Greenwood, 2018. — 220 p. Unlike previous works that focus on the relationships of the Chippewa with the colonial governments of France, Great Britain, and the United States, this volume offers a historical account of the Chippewa with the tribe at its center. The volume covers Chippewa history chronologically from about 10,000 BC to the present and is geographically...
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Yale University Press, 2003. — 464 p. This absorbing book is the first ever to focus on the traffic in Indian slaves during the early years of the American South. The Indian slave trade was of central importance from the Carolina coast to the Mississippi Valley for nearly fifty years, linking southern lives and creating a whirlwind of violence and profit-making, argues Alan...
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Brill Academic Publishers, 2018. — 334 p. Quakers and Native Americans is a collection of essays examining the history of interactions between Quakers and American Indians from the 1650s, emphasising American Indian influence on Quaker history as well as Quaker influence on U.S. policy toward American Indians. Ignacio Gallup-Diaz is Professor of history at Bryn Mawr College. He is...
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University of Nebraska Press, 2017. — 306 p. In "The Native South", Tim Alan Garrison and Greg O’Brien assemble contributions from leading ethnohistorians of the American South in a state-of-the-field volume of Native American history from the sixteenth to the twenty-first century. Spanning such subjects as Seminole–African American kinship systems, Cherokee notions of guilt and...
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Routledge, 2012. — 400 p. Indians of the Great Plains, written by Daniel J. Gelo of The University of Texas at San Antonio, is a text that emphasizes that Plains societies and cultures are continuing, living entities. Through a topical exploration, it provides a contemporary view of recent scholarship on the classic Horse Culture Period while also bringing readers up-to-date with...
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Routledge, 2012. — 400 p. Indians of the Great Plains, written by Daniel J. Gelo of The University of Texas at San Antonio, is a text that emphasizes that Plains societies and cultures are continuing, living entities. Through a topical exploration, it provides a contemporary view of recent scholarship on the classic Horse Culture Period while also bringing readers up-to-date with...
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Texas A&M University Press, 2018. — 272 p. In 1851, an article appeared in a German journal, Geographisches Jahrbuch (Geographic Yearbook) , that sought to establish definitive connections, using language observations, among the Comanches, Shoshones, and Apaches. Heinrich Berghaus’s study was based on lexical data gathered by a young German settler in Texas, Emil Kriewitz, and...
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Revised, Subsequent edition. With an introduction and edition by Frederick W. Turner. — Plume, 1996. — 208 p. This book contains one of the most extraordinary and invaluable documents in the annals of Native American history - the authentic testament of a remarkable “war shaman” who for several years held off both Mexico and the United States in fierce defense of Apache lands....
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University of Oklahoma Press, 1975. — 387 p. The Kickapoo Indians resisted outsiders’ every attempt to settle their lands--until finally they were forced to remove west of the Mississippi River to the plains of the Southwest. There they continued to wage war and acted as traders for border captives and goods. In 1873 they reluctantly settled on a reservation in Indian Territory....
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Beacon Press, 2019. — 224 p. Through the unique lens of "Indigenized environmental justice", Indigenous researcher and activist Dina Gilio-Whitaker explores the fraught history of treaty violations, struggles for food and water security, and protection of sacred sites, while highlighting the important leadership of Indigenous women in this centuries-long struggle. As Long As Grass...
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University of Nebraska Press, 2014. — 136 p. At the end of the Southern Plains Indian wars in 1875, the War Department shipped seventy-two Kiowa, Cheyenne, Arapaho, Comanche, and Caddo prisoners from Fort Sill, Oklahoma, to Fort Marion in St. Augustine, Florida. These most resistant Native people, referred to as “trouble causers,” arrived to curious, boisterous crowds eager to see...
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Hill and Wang, 2007. — 448 p. Combining compelling narrative and grand historical sweep, Forgotten Allies offers a vivid account of the Oneida Indians, forgotten heroes of the American Revolution who risked their homeland, their culture, and their lives to join in a war that gave birth to a new nation at the expense of their own. Revealing for the first time the full sacrifice of...
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Stackpole Books, 1997. — 352 p. Some of the most savage war in world history was waged on the American Plains from 1865 to 1879. As settlers moved west following the Civil War, they found powerful Indian tribes barring the way. When the U.S. Army intervened, a bloody and prolonged conflict ensued. Drawing heavily from diaries, letters, and memoirs from American Plains...
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Stackpole Books, 1997. — 352 p. Some of the most savage war in world history was waged on the American Plains from 1865 to 1879. As settlers moved west following the Civil War, they found powerful Indian tribes barring the way. When the U.S. Army intervened, a bloody and prolonged conflict ensued. Drawing heavily from diaries, letters, and memoirs from American Plains settlers,...
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University of Arizona Press, 1971. — 330 p. This is a remarkable series of personal narrations from Western Apaches before and just after the various agencies and sub-agencies were established. It also includes extensive commentary on weapons and traditions, with Apache words and phrases translated and complete annotation.
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Harper, 2008. — 414 p. Nearly three centuries before Lewis and Clark's epic trek to the Pacific coast, an African slave named Esteban Dorantes became America's first great explorer and adventurer; the first pioneer from the Old World to explore the entirety of the American South. Shipwrecked off the Florida coast, Esteban guided a small band of survivors on an incredible,...
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Stackpole Books, 1994. — 352 p. First published in 1926 and respected ever since for its measured view of the most famous battle in the American West, The Story of the Little Big Horn asks questions that are still being debated. What were the causes of the debacle that wiped out Custer’s command? Was it due to lack of a definite battle plan? To lack of correct information about...
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Doubleday, 2017. — 352 p. — ISBN 9780385534253. New York Times Bestseller - National Book Award Finalist - Amazon Editor's Pick for the Best Book of 2017. Shelf Awareness’s Best Book of 2017. Named a best book of the year by Wall Street Journal, GQ, Time, Newsday, Entertainment Weekly, NPR's Maureen Corrigan, NPR's "On Point", Vogue.com, Smithsonian, Cosmopolitan, Seattle Times,...
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Liveright, 2014. — 368 p. National Book Award-winning histories such as "The Hemingses of Monticello" and "Slaves in the Family" have raised our awareness about America's intimately mixed black and white past. Award-winning western historian Andrew R. Graybill now sheds light on the overlooked interracial Native-white relationships critical in the development of the...
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Michigan State University Press, 1996. — 250 p. The Wounded Knee Massacre of December 29, 1890, known to U.S. military historians as the last battle in "the Indian Wars," was in reality another tragic event in a larger pattern of conquest, destruction, killing, and broken promises that continue to this day. On a cold winter's morning more than a century ago, the U.S. Seventh...
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Michigan State University Press, 1996. — 250 p. The Wounded Knee Massacre of December 29, 1890, known to U.S. military historians as the last battle in "the Indian Wars," was in reality another tragic event in a larger pattern of conquest, destruction, killing, and broken promises that continue to this day. On a cold winter's morning more than a century ago, the U.S. Seventh...
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University of Nebraska Press, 2009. — 286 p. Prior to widespread literacy, the Kiowa people recorded their history in pictorial calendars, marking an entry for each summer and each winter. "One Hundred Summers" presents a recently discovered calendar, created by the Kiowa master artist Silver Horn. Covering the period from 1828 to 1928, the pictures trace Kiowa experiences from...
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University of Nebraska Press, 2009. — 286 p. Prior to widespread literacy, the Kiowa people recorded their history in pictorial calendars, marking an entry for each summer and each winter. "One Hundred Summers" presents a recently discovered calendar, created by the Kiowa master artist Silver Horn. Covering the period from 1828 to 1928, the pictures trace Kiowa experiences from...
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University of Oklahoma Press, 2000. — 192 p. The Great Sioux War of 1876-1877 is memorable to most Americans because of Lieutenant Colonel George A. Custer’s last stand at the Battle of the Little Big Horn. But to the Lakotas (Western Sioux) and Northern Cheyennes who won that battle but lost the war, the experience of those fifteen months was truly a "last stand" - a cultural...
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University of Oklahoma Press, 2003. — 304 p. From a recognized authority on the High Plains Indians wars comes this narrative history blending both American Indian and U.S. Army perspectives on the attack that destroyed the village of Northern Cheyenne chief Morning Star. Of momentous significance for the Cheyennes as well as the army, this November 1876 encounter, coming exactly...
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Montana Historical Society Press, 2001. — 366 p. "Nez Perce Summer", 1877 tells the story of a people's epic struggle to survive in the face of unrelenting military force. Written by a noted frontier military historian and reviewed by members of the Nez Perce tribe, this is the most definitive treatment of the Nez Perce War to date.
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University of Oklahoma Press, 1990. — 212 p. General George Crook’s controversial “Horsemeat March” culminating in the battle at Slim Buttes is considered the turning point of the Sioux Wars. After Lieutenant General George A. Custer’s shocking defeat at the Little Big Horn River, Montana Territory, in 1876, General Crook and the men of this Big Horn and Yellowstone Expedition...
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University of Oklahoma Press, 2004. — 242 p. The 1864 Sand Creek Massacre is one of the most disturbing and controversial events in American history. While its historical significance is undisputed, the exact location of the massacre has been less clear. Because the site is sacred ground for Cheyenne and Arapaho Indians, the question of its location is more than academic; it is...
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Bedford/St. Martin's, 2000. — 240 p. As a 73-volume library, the original The Jesuit Relations has long been inaccessible to undergraduate students. Vitally important, the writings of seventeenth-century French Jesuits in Native North America tell the story of early American encounters. This new edition deftly binds them into a thematically arranged, 35-document sampler with a...
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Cambridge University Press, 2018. — 464 p. — (Studies in North American Indian History). Allan Greer examines the processes by which forms of land tenure emerged and natives were dispossessed from the sixteenth to the eighteenth centuries in New France (Canada), New Spain (Mexico), and New England. By focusing on land, territory, and property, he deploys the concept of 'property...
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University of Oklahoma Press, 1998. — 320 p. Apaches at War and Peace is the story of the Chiricahua Apaches on the northern frontier of New Spain from 1750 to 1858, especially those within the region of the Janos presidio in northwestern Chihuahua. Using previously untapped archives in Spain, Mexico, and the United States, William Griffen relates how Apache raids and other...
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Lehigh University Press, 2017. — 354 p. During the early eighteenth century, three phratries or tribes (Turtle, Turkey, and Wolf) of Delaware Indians left their traditional homeland in the Delaware River watershed and moved west to the Allegheny Valley of western Pennsylvania and eventually across the Ohio River into the Muskingum River valley. As newcomers to the colonial...
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University of Nebraska Press, 2008. — 388 p. The Tlingits, the largest Indian group in Alaska, have lived in Alaska's coastal southwestern region for centuries and first met non-Natives in 1741 during an encounter with the crew of the Russian explorer Alexei Chirikov. The volatile and complex connections between the Tlingits and their Russian neighbors, as well as British and...
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Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 1955. — 480 p. Without critical comment or biased judgement, George Bird Grinnell-one of the truly great historians of the American Indian-has recorded the major battles that the Cheyennes fought. In this account the entire gallery of the heroic Cheyenne chiefs and warriors-Roman Nose and Black Kettle and Dull Knife and many others-emerge...
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Foreword by Winona LaDuke. — University of Washington Press, 2017. — 392 p. Often when Native nations assert their treaty rights and sovereignty, they are confronted with a backlash from their neighbors, who are fearful of losing control of the natural resources. Yet, when both groups are faced with an outside threat to their common environment such as mines, dams, or an oil...
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University of Oklahoma Press, 2011. — 256 p. A concise history of the Indians said to have sold Manhattan for $24. The Indian sale of Manhattan is one of the world's most cherished legends. Few people know that the Indians who made the fabled sale were Munsees whose ancestral homeland lay between the lower Hudson and upper Delaware river valleys. The story of the Munsee people...
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Northern Illinois University Press, 1974. — 326 p. Focusing on the ultimate fate of the Cuartelejo and/or Paloma Apaches known in archaeological terms as the Dismal River people of the Central Plains, this book is divided into 2 parts. The early Apache (1525-1700) and the Jicarilla Apache (1700-1800) tribes are studied in terms of their persistent cultural survival,...
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Colorado Bureau of Land Management, 1989. — 80 p. — (Cultural Resource Series 26). In broad outline, native occupation of the Central High Plains can be summarized as follows. The area west of the eastern foothills of the Rocky Mountains, in south-cental Colorado, was dominated throughout the historic period by Utes who joined the Comanche bands after 1706 to make forays onto the...
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Greenwood, 2010. — 178 p. "Chief Joseph: A Biography" explores the world of the Nez Perce Indians from their entrance into the Columbia Plateau through their relations with the expanding United States. It recounts their attempt to accommodate the rapidly changing world around them, and it follows the life of Chief Joseph, one of their greatest peace leaders. Readers will learn how...
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New York: Scribner, 2010. — 384 p. In the tradition of "Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee", a stunningly vivid historical account of the forty-year battle between Comanche Indians and white settlers for control of the American West, centering on Quanah, the greatest Comanche chief of them all. S. C. Gwynne’s "Empire of the Summer Moon" spans two astonishing stories. The first...
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  • 826,71 КБ
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New York: Scribner, 2010. — 384 p. In the tradition of "Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee", a stunningly vivid historical account of the forty-year battle between Comanche Indians and white settlers for control of the American West, centering on Quanah, the greatest Comanche chief of them all. S. C. Gwynne’s "Empire of the Summer Moon" spans two astonishing stories. The first traces...
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  • 3,72 МБ
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Omohundro Institute and University of North Carolina Press, 2005. — 496 p. Recovering lost voices and exploring issues intimate and institutional, this sweeping examination of Spanish California illuminates Indian struggles against a confining colonial order and amidst harrowing depopulation. To capture the enormous challenges Indians confronted, Steven W. Hackel integrates...
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University of Oklahoma Press, 1997. — 288 p. In Theodore Roosevelt and Six Friends of the Indian , William T. Hagan describes the efforts by six prominent individuals and two institutions to influence the conduct of Indian affairs during the administrations of President Theodore Roosevelt. The institutions are the Bureau of Catholic Indian Missions and the Indian Rights...
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University of Oklahoma Press, 1997. — 288 p. In Theodore Roosevelt and Six Friends of the Indian , William T. Hagan describes the efforts by six prominent individuals and two institutions to influence the conduct of Indian affairs during the administrations of President Theodore Roosevelt. The institutions are the Bureau of Catholic Indian Missions and the Indian Rights...
  • №282
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University of Nebraska Press, 2014. — 356 p. Drawing on archaeological evidence and utilizing often neglected Spanish source material, The Invention of the Creek Nation, 1670–1763 , explores the political history of the Creek Indians of Georgia and Alabama and the emergence of the Creek Nation during the colonial era in the American Southeast. In part a study of Creek foreign...
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University of Oklahoma Press, 1982. — 365 p. A sedentary fishing tribe in the plateau and mountain country of central Idaho, northeastern Oregon, and southeastern Washington, the Nez Percés were transformed by the acquisition of the horse into a tribe that hunted on the plains and assimilated much of the buffalo culture. In the mountains their traditional enemies were the...
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University of Alabama Press, 1995. — 332 p. The first edition of Halbert and Ball's Creek War was published in 1895, and a new edition containing an introductory essay, supplementary notes, a bibliography, and an index by Frank L. Owsley Jr., was published in 1969. This standard account of one of the most controversial wars in which Americans have fought is again available, with...
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University of Oklahoma Press, 1997. — 544 p. "Apaches: A History and Culture Portrait", James L. Haley’s dramatic saga of the Apaches’ doomed guerrilla war against the whites, marks a radical departure from the method followed by previous histories of white-Native conflict. Arguing that "you cannot understand the history unless you understand the culture," Haley first discusses...
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University of Oklahoma Press, 1997. — 544 p. "Apaches: A History and Culture Portrait", James L. Haley’s dramatic saga of the Apaches’ doomed guerrilla war against the whites, marks a radical departure from the method followed by previous histories of white-Native conflict. Arguing that "you cannot understand the history unless you understand the culture," Haley first discusses...
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Doubleday, 1976. — 290 p. Gen. Phil Sheridan called the Red River War of 1874 the most successful Indian campaign ever waged. Many of its incidents have become frontier legends, but only here is the extraordinary episode chronicled in full in all of its intricate ad amazing detail. Author/historian James L. Haley has carefully analyzed the causes of the Indian unrest, centering...
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McGill-Queen's University Press, 2015. — 604 p. Though some believe that the Indian treaties of the 1870s achieved a unity of purpose between the Canadian government and First Nations, in From Treaties to Reserves D.J. Hall asserts that - as a result of profound cultural differences - each side interpreted the negotiations differently, leading to conflict and an acute sense of...
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University of British Columbia Press, 2011. — 64 p. The massive wood carvings unique to the Indian peoples of the Northwest Coast arouse a sense of wonder in all who see them. This guide helps the reader to understand and enjoy the form and meaning of totem poles and other sculptures. The author describes the origin and place of totem poles in Indian culture -- as ancestral...
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Yale University Press, 2009. — 512 p. In the eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries, a Native American empire rose to dominate the fiercely contested lands of the American Southwest, the southern Great Plains, and northern Mexico. This powerful empire, built by the Comanche Indians, eclipsed its various European rivals in military prowess, political prestige, economic power,...
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University Press of Florida, 2006. — 240 p. This is the first book-length study to use Spanish language sources in documenting the original Indian inhabitants of West Florida who, from the late 16th century to the 1740s, lived to the west and the north of the Apalachee. Previous authors who studied the forebears of Creeks and Seminoles from the Chattahoochee Valley have relied...
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University of Virginia Press, 2018. — 232 p. While Jamestown and colonial settlements dominate narratives of Virginia’s earliest days, the land’s oldest history belongs to its native people. Monacan Millennium tells the story of the Monacan Indian people of Virginia, stretching from 1000 A.D. through the moment of colonial contact in 1607 and into the present. Written from an...
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University of Pennsylvania Press, 2018. — 272 p. The revolutionary Ohio Valley is often depicted as a chaotic Hobbesian dystopia, in which Indians and colonists slaughtered each other at every turn. In Unsettling the West , Rob Harper overturns this familiar story. Rather than flailing in a morass, the peoples of the revolutionary Ohio Valley actively and persistently sought to...
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Cambridge University Press, 1994. — 320 p. — (Studies in North American Indian History). Crow Dog's Case is the first social history of American Indians' role in the making of American law. The book sheds new light on Native American struggles for sovereignty and justice in nineteenth century America. This "century of dishonor," a time when American Indians' lands were lost and...
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University of Utah Press, 2018. — 352 p. Drawing from forty-five years of experience, E. Richard Hart elucidates the use of history as expert testimony in American Indian tribal litigation. Such lawsuits deal with aboriginal territory; hunting, fishing, and plant gathering rights; reservation boundaries; water rights; federal recognition; and other questions that have a historical...
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Utah State University Press, 2003. — 200 p. Pedro Pino, or Lai-iu-ah-tsai-lu (his Zuni name) was for many years the most important Zuni political leader. He served during a period of tremendous change and challenges for his people. Born in 1788, captured by Navajos in his teens, he was sold into a New Mexican household, where he obtained his Spanish name. When he returned to Zuni,...
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St. Martin's Press, 2012. — 336 p. At the time of his death in 1838, Seminole warrior Osceola was the most famous and respected Native American in the world. Born a Creek, young Osceola was driven from his home by General Andrew Jackson to Spanish Florida, where he joined the Seminole tribe. Years later, President Jackson signed the Indian Removal Act, which was not only intended...
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St. Martin's Press, 2012. — 336 p. At the time of his death in 1838, Seminole warrior Osceola was the most famous and respected Native American in the world. Born a Creek, young Osceola was driven from his home by General Andrew Jackson to Spanish Florida, where he joined the Seminole tribe. Years later, President Jackson signed the Indian Removal Act, which was not only intended...
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University of New Mexico Press, 1998. — 428 p. This book examines for the first time the military campaigns on both sides of the border against Apaches and other native peoples in the late nineteenth century. Mexico and the United States pursued similar objectives in their Indian policies. Railroad, mining, and agricultural interests grew at the expense of native peoples. Indian...
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Free Press, 1995. — 304 p. Very little of the information in this history of Native American participation in the Civil War is wholly news, and some--such as that Grant's aide, Eli Parker, was an Iroquois chief and that Cherokees under Stand Watie fought for the Confederacy--is known to most well-read Civil War enthusiasts. But no other recent author has pulled together into one...
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State University of New York Press, 2011. — 236 p. The remarkable story of the Tonawanda Senecas in the face of overwhelming odds is the centerpiece of this landmark community study. In the six decades prior to the Civil War, they wrestled with pressures from land companies; the local, state, and federal officials’ policies to acquire tribal lands and remove the Indians; misguided...
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University of Oklahoma Press, 2002. — 236 p. Chief Daniel Bread (1800-1873) played a key role in establishing the Oneida Indians’ presence in Wisconsin after their removal from New York, yet no monument commemorates his deeds as the community’s founder. Laurence M. Hauptman and L. Gordon McLester III, redress that historical oversight, connecting Bread’s life story with the...
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University of Oklahoma Press, 1993. — 288 p. Before their massacre by Massachusetts Puritans in 1637, the Pequots were preeminent in southern New England. Their location on the eastern Connecticut shore made them important producers of the wampum required to trade for furs from the Iroquois. They were also the only Connecticut Indians to oppose the land-hungry English. For those...
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Norman, OK: University of Oklahoma Press, 2019. — 326 p. — (New directions in Native American studies series ; volume 17). The disastrous Buffalo Creek Treaty of 1838 called for the Senecas’ removal to Kansas (then part of the Indian Territory). From this low point, the Seneca Nation of Indians, which today occupies three reservations in western New York, sought to rebound....
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McGill-Queen's University Press, 2001. — 320 p. The story of one of the most significant European-Native diplomatic negotiations of the colonial period and the resulting treaty. The last decades of the seventeenth century were marked by persistent, bloody conflicts between the French and their Native allies on the one side and the Iroquois confederacy on the other. In the summer...
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University of Nebraska Press, 2018. — 864 p. Between 1827 and 1837 approximately twenty-three thousand Creek Indians were transported across the Mississippi River, exiting their homeland under extreme duress and complex pressures. During the physically and emotionally exhausting journey, hundreds of Creeks died, dozens were born, and almost no one escaped without emotional scars...
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University Press of New England, 1994. — 338 p. In a thoroughly enjoyable and readable book Haviland and Power effectively shatter the myth that Indians never lived in Vermont.
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McFarland & Company Publishers, 2018. — 263 p. — ISBN 978-1-476665-10-8. The U.S.–Dakota War, the bloodiest Indian war of the 19th century, erupted in southwestern Minnesota during the summer of 1862. In the war’s aftermath, a hastily convened commission of five army officers conducted trials of 391 Indians charged with murder and massacre. In 36 days, 303 Dakota men were...
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University of Georgia Press, 2018. — 310 p. Patrolling the Border focuses on a late eighteenth-century conflict between Creek Indians and Georgians. The conflict was marked by years of seemingly random theft and violence culminating in open war along the Oconee River, the contested border between the two peoples. Joshua S. Haynes argues that the period should be viewed as the...
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Scarecrow Press, 1987. — 421 p. A need exists for works of first reference that provide insights into both sides of Indian-white relations. This handbook is intended to help fill the need. The work will be divided regionally, with Vol. I relating events in the Southeastern Woodlands. This handbook pulls together hard-to-locate information on the events and participants, white and...
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Scarecrow Press, 1987. — 417 p. The relationship between North American Indians and Europeans, friendly at first, took a violent turn with the kidnapping of natives by mariners, and conflict flared as the frontier line moved northward from Mexico and westward from the Atlantic coast settlements. This handbook is intended to help fill the need for works of first reference that...
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Scarecrow Press, 1987. — 288 p. A need exists for works of first reference that provide insights into both sides of Indian-white relations. This handbook is intended to help fill the need. The work will be divided regionally, with Vol. III relating events in the Great Plains. This handbook pulls together hard-to-locate information on the events and participants, white and Indian,...
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University of Oklahoma Press, 2016. — 472 p. The Great Sioux War of 1876–77 began at daybreak on March 17, 1876, when Colonel Joseph J. Reynolds and six cavalry companies struck a village of Northern Cheyennes - Sioux allies - thereby propelling the Northern Plains tribes into war. The ensuing last stand of the Sioux against Anglo-American settlement of their homeland spanned some...
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Norman, OK: University of Oklahoma Press, 2019. — 496 p., 63 b&w illustrations, 6 maps. The Battle of the Rosebud may well be the largest Indian battle ever fought in the American West. The monumental clash on June 17, 1876, along Rosebud Creek in southeastern Montana pitted George Crook and his Shoshone and Crow allies against Sioux and Northern Cheyennes under Sitting Bull and...
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Wilfrid Laurier University Press, 2013. — 372 p. Drawing on themes from John MacKenzie’s Empires of Nature and the Nature of Empires (1997), this book explores, from Indigenous or Indigenous-influenced perspectives, the power of nature and the attempts by empires (United States, Canada, and Britain) to control it. It also examines contemporary threats to First Nations communities...
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Wilfrid Laurier University Press, 2013. — 372 p. Drawing on themes from John MacKenzie’s Empires of Nature and the Nature of Empires (1997), this book explores, from Indigenous or Indigenous-influenced perspectives, the power of nature and the attempts by empires (United States, Canada, and Britain) to control it. It also examines contemporary threats to First Nations communities...
  • №317
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University of New Mexico Press, 1996. — 175 p. This long-lost journal, now available in paperback, gives a unique look into the old Navajo country. Recently rediscovered, it is both the earliest and only extensive eyewitness account of the traditional Navajo homeland in the eighteenth century. It reveals new information on Hispanic New Mexico and relations with the Indians. For...
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University of Alaska Press, 2017. — 305 p. Across the Shaman’s River is the story of one of Alaska’s last Native American strongholds, a Tlingit community closed off for a century until a fateful encounter between a shaman, a preacher, and John Muir. Tucked in the corner of Southeast Alaska, the Tlingits had successfully warded off the Anglo influences that had swept into other...
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University of New Mexico Press, 2018. — 304 p. When Pueblo Indians say, "The first white man our people saw was a black man", they are referring to Esteban, who came to New Mexico in 1539. After centuries of negative portrayals, this book highlights Esteban's importance in America's early history. Books about the history of the American West have ignored Esteban or belittled his...
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McFarland, 2015. — 232 p. Drawing on a rare family archive and archival material from the Osage Nation, this book documents a unique relationship among white settlers, the Osage and African Americans in Oklahoma. The history of white settlement and colonization is often discussed in the context of the cultural erasure of, and violence perpetuated against, American Indians and...
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University of Texas Press, 1998. — 298 p. In the late sixteenth century, Spanish explorers described encounters with North American people they called "Jumanos." Although widespread contact with Jumanos is evident in accounts of exploration and colonization in New Mexico, Texas, and adjacent regions, their scattered distribution and scant documentation have led to long-standing...
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Grove Press, 2011. — 448 p. Toward the Setting Sun chronicles one of the most significant but least explored periods in American history - the nineteenth century forced removal of Native Americans from their lands - through the story of Chief John Ross, who came to be known as the Cherokee Moses. Son of a Scottish trader and a quarter-Cherokee woman, Ross was educated in white...
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University of Manitoba Press, 2017. — 344 p. If one seeks to understand Haudenosaunee (Six Nations) history, one must consider the history of Haudenosaunee land. For countless generations prior to European contact, land and territory informed Haudenosaunee thought and philosophy, and was a primary determinant of Haudenosaunee identity. In "The Clay We Are Made Of", Susan M. Hill...
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University of Nevada Press, 2013. — 512 p. The Native American inhabitants of North America’s Great Basin have a long, eventful history and rich cultures. "Great Basin Indians: An Encyclopedic History" covers all aspects of their world. The book is organized in an encyclopedic format to allow full discussion of many diverse topics, including geography, religion, significant...
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University of Nebraska Press, 2019. — 354 p. In Ecology and Ethnogenesis Adam R. Hodge argues that the Eastern Shoshone tribe, now located on the Wind River Reservation in Wyoming, underwent a process of ethnogenesis through cultural attachment to its physical environment that proved integral to its survival and existence. He explores the intersection of environmental, indigenous,...
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University Press of Colorado, 2002. — 280 p. Popularized by Mari Sandoz's "Cheyenne Autumn," the Northern Cheyennes' 1878 escape from their Indian Territory Reservation to their native homeland beyond the Platte River has recently been the subject of renewed academic interest. But unlike other books written about the exodus of the Northern Cheyennes, Stan Hoig's "Perilous...
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University of Oklahoma Press, 1998. — 352 p. In "Beyond the Frontie"r, Stan Hoig chronicles early explorations of Oklahoma. Focusing on expeditions during the first part of the nineteenth century, Hoig provides a useful history of the region during the period of its first discovery by the outside world. After describing what we know of Native life before the arrival of...
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University of Oklahoma Press, 1990. — 220 p. A Plains tribe that subsisted on the buffalo, the Cheyennes depended for survival on the valor and skill of their braves in the hunt and in battle. The fiery spirit of the young warriors was balanced by the calm wisdom of the tribal headmen, the peace chiefs, who met yearly as the Council of the Forty-four. "A Cheyenne chief was...
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University of Oklahoma Press, 1993. — 356 p. "Tribal Wars of the Southern Plains" is a comprehensive account of Indian conflicts in the area between the Platte River and the Rio Grande, from the first written reports of the Spaniards in the sixteenth century through the United States-Cheyenne Battle of the Sand Hills in 1875. The reader follows the exploits and defeats of such...
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  • 3,06 МБ
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Kirksville, MO: Truman State University Press, 2010. — (The Truman Legacy Series; v. 4). — 254 p. Harry S. Truman’s presidency coincided with the beginning of a dramatic shift in the relationship between the U.S. government and Native Americans. Under Truman, the federal government turned away from Roosevelt’s Indian New Deal, and toward a series of policies known as...
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New edition — University of Nebraska Press/Bison Books, 2017. — 408 p. — (Introduction by Nicole Tonkovich). In Saga of Chief Joseph , Helen Addison Howard has written the definitive biography of the great Nez Perce chief, a diplomat among warriors. In times of war and peace, Chief Joseph exhibited gifts of the first rank as a leader for peace and tribal liberty. Following his...
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New edition — University of Nebraska Press/Bison Books, 2017. — 408 p. — (Introduction by Nicole Tonkovich). In Saga of Chief Joseph , Helen Addison Howard has written the definitive biography of the great Nez Perce chief, a diplomat among warriors. In times of war and peace, Chief Joseph exhibited gifts of the first rank as a leader for peace and tribal liberty. Following his...
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Fernwood Books Ltd., 2015. — 206 p. In 2009, the New Brunswick provincial government leased over a million hectares of land to Texas-based Southwestern Energy for the purposes of natural gas extraction. For years, tens of thousands of New Brunswickers signed petitions, wrote letters, demonstrated and sought legal recourse against the deal and the threat of hydraulic fracturing it...
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University of Nebraska Press, 2001. — 350 pp. — ISBN 0-8032-7327-4. In a field as well worked as nineteenth century American Indian policy, one expects little new to arise. But Frederick E. Hoxie approaches this topic from a larger cultural and political perspective and provides intriguing insights into the assimilation campaign as a reflection of changes in white society and...
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2nd Edition — Wiley-Blackwell, 1997. — 320 p. Like its highly popular and distinctive predecessor, this new edition of Indians in American History strives to fully integrate Indians into the conventional U.S. history narrative. Meticulously reedited throughout, this beautifully illustrated book features fourteen essays by fifteen authors who speak from a variety of disciplines and...
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University of North Carolina Press, 2003. — 288 p. "This book begins where the reach of archaeology and history ends", writes Charles Hudson. Grounded in careful research, his extraordinary work imaginatively brings to life the sixteenth-century world of the Coosa, a native people whose territory stretched across the Southeast, encompassing much of present-day Tennessee, Georgia,...
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University of Georgia Press, 1998. — 592 p. Between 1539 and 1542 Hernando de Soto led a small army on a desperate journey of exploration of almost four thousand miles across the Southeast. Until now, his path has been one of history's most intriguing mysteries. With Knights of Spain, Warriors of the Sun , anthropologist Charles Hudson offers a solution to the question, "Where did...
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University of Wisconsin Press, 1978. — 218 p. George T. Hunt’s classic 1940 study of the Iroquois during the middle and late seventeenth century presents warfare as a result of depletion of natural resources in the Iroquois homeland and tribal efforts to assume the role of middlemen in the fur trade between the Indians to the west and the Europeans.
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New edition — Yale University Press, 1990. — 332 p. During the middle decades of the nineteenth century, when vast numbers of whites poured into California, the native Indian population was decimated through disease, starvation, homicide, and a declining birth rate. In this prize-winning book, Albert L. Hurtado focuses on the Indians who survived this harrowing time. Hurtado...
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Crown, 2016. — 544 p. In the tradition of "Empire of the Summer Moon", a stunningly vivid historical account of the manhunt for Geronimo and the 25-year Apache struggle for their homeland They called him Mickey Free. His kidnapping started the longest war in American history, and both sides--the Apaches and the white invaders - blamed him for it. A mixed-blood warrior who...
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  • 4,51 МБ
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University of Oklahoma Press, 1959. — 231 p. From the prehistoric period to the coming of Europeans, this is a fascinating and well-written account of Indian life from the period of 1300 to 1800, dealing with many tribes in a lively and intelligent narrative.
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University of Oklahoma Press, 1974. — 372 p. — (The Civilization of the American Indian Series 128). No assessment of the Plains Indians can be complete without some account of the Pawnees. They ranged from Nebraska to Mexico and, when not fighting among themselves, fought with almost every other Plains tribe at one time or another. Regarded as "aliens" by many other tribes, the...
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University of Georgia Press, 2017. — 184 p. By following key families in Cherokee, Chickasaw, and Anglo-American societies from the Seven Years’ War through 1845, this study illustrates how kinship networks - forged out of natal, marital, or fictive kinship relationships - enabled and directed the actions of their members as they decided the futures of their nations. Natalie R....
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University of Manitoba Press, 2013. — 216 p. In the pre-reserve era, Aboriginal bands in the northern plains maintained fluid and inclusive membership through traditional kinship practices governed by the Law of the People as described in traditional Elder Brother stories. Elder Brother stories outlined social interaction, marriage, adoption, and kinship roles and...
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  • 4,85 МБ
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University of Manitoba Press, 2013. — 216 p. In the pre-reserve era, Aboriginal bands in the northern plains maintained fluid and inclusive membership through traditional kinship practices governed by the Law of the People as described in traditional Elder Brother stories. Elder Brother stories outlined social interaction, marriage, adoption, and kinship roles and...
  • №346
  • 533,82 КБ
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New York, N.Y.: Penguin Press, 2015. — 480 p. Jacksonland is the thrilling narrative history of two men—President Andrew Jackson and Cherokee chief John Ross—who led their respective nations at a crossroads of American history. Five decades after the Revolutionary War, the United States approached a constitutional crisis. At its center stood two former military comrades locked in...
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University of Oklahoma Press, 1985. — 288 p. The massacre at Wounded Knee, South Dakota, in the December snows of 1890 was the last formal military encounter between the United States and Indian tribes. It is also the event with which most studies of Indian history conclude. Histories of Indian life since then are, as Vine Deloria, Jr., has stressed, sorely needed. With this...
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Wiley-Blackwell, 2015. — 360 p. In addition to revisions and updates, the second edition of "We Are Still Here" features new material, seeing this well-loved American History Series volume maintain its treatment of American Indians in the 20th century while extending its coverage into the opening decades of the 21st century. Provides student and general readers concise and...
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University of New Mexico Press, 2002. — 432 p. This comprehensive narrative traces the history of the Navajos from their origins to the beginning of the twenty-first century. Based on extensive archival research, traditional accounts, interviews, historic and contemporary photographs, and firsthand observation, it provides a detailed, up-to-date portrait of the Diné past and...
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Dover Publications, 2003. — 352 p. Sharply critical of the United States government's cruelty toward Native Americans, this monumental study describes the maltreatment of Indians as far back as the American Revolution. Focusing on the Delaware and the Cheyenne, the text goes on to document and deplore the sufferings of the Sioux, Nez Percé, Ponca, Winnebago, and Cherokee - in the...
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  • 758,07 КБ
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