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Suvorov Viktor. The chief culprit: Stalin's grand design to start World War II

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Suvorov Viktor. The chief culprit: Stalin's grand design to start World War II
Naval Institute Press, 2008. — 382 p. — ISBN 978-1-59114-838-8
In The Chief Culprit, bestselling author Victor Suvorov probes newly released Soviet documents and reevaluates existing historical material to analyze Stalin's strategic design to conquer Europe and the reasons behind his controversial support for Nazi Germany. A former Soviet army intelligence officer, the author explains that Stalin's strategy leading up to World War II grew from Lenin's belief that if World War I did not ignite the worldwide Communist revolution, then a second world war would be needed to achieve it. Stalin saw Nazi Germany as the power that would fight and weaken capitalist countries so that Soviet armies could then sweep across Europe. Suvorov reveals how Stalin conspired with German leaders to bypass the Versailles Treaty, which forbade German rearmament, and secretly trained German engineers and officers and provided bases and factories for war. He also calls attention to the 1939 non-aggression pact between the Soviet Union and Germany that allowed Hitler to proceed with his plans to invade Poland, fomenting war in Europe.
Suvorov debunks the theory that Stalin was duped by Hitler and that the Soviet Union was a victim of Nazi aggression. Instead, he makes the case that Stalin neither feared Hitler nor mistakenly trusted him. Suvorov maintains that after Germany occupied Poland, defeated France, and started to prepare for an invasion of Great Britain, Hitler's intelligence services detected the Soviet Union's preparations for a major war against Germany. This detection, he argues, led to Germany's preemptive war plan and the launch of an invasion of the USSR. Stalin emerges from the pages of this book as a diabolical genius consumed by visions of a worldwide Communist revolution at any cost — a leader who wooed Hitler and Germany in his own effort to conquer the world. In contradicting traditional theories about Soviet planning before the German invasion and in arguing for a revised view of Stalin's real intentions, The Chief Culprit is certain to provoke debate among historians throughout the world.
Contents
Preface
Acknowledgements
Introduction
The Struggle for Peace, and Its Results
First Attempts to Unleash a Second World War
The First Contact
Stalin's Role in the Rebirth of German War Power
Why Did Stalin Like Hitler's Book So Much?
Industrialization and Collectivization
Stalin's Role in Elevating Hitler
Stalin and the Destruction of Soviet Strategic Aviation
Stalin's Preparations for War: Tanks
On the "Obsolete" Soviet Tanks
Winged Genghis Khan
About "Obsolete" Airplanes
Soviet Airborne Assault Troops and Their Mission
About the Brilliant Military Leader Tukhachevski
The Cleansing
Spain
Stalin's Trap for Hitler
Results of the Moscow Pact
Blitzkrieg in Poland and Mongolia
Mobilization
Mobilization of the Economy
The Winter War: Finland
Germany's Strategic Resources and Stalin's Plans
The Carving Up of Romania, and Its Consequences
Destruction of the Buffer States between Germany and the Soviet Union
Destruction of the Security Pale on the Eve of the War
Partisans or Saboteurs?
Destruction of the Stalin Line
Trotsky Murdered, Molotov in Berlin
Kremlin Games
All the Way to Berlin!
Mountain Divisions on the Steppes of Ukraine
Stalin in May
June 13, 1941
Words and Deeds
Red Army, Black Gulag Uniforms
Military Alignment
Churchill's Warning and Stalin's Reaction
A Blitzkrieg against Russia?
Intelligence Reports and Stalin's Reaction
The War Has Begun
Stalin's Panic
If It Weren't for Winter!
A Model War
Conclusion: The Aggressor
Epilogue: Stalin Was a War Criminal
List of Abbreviations
Notes
Bibliography
Index
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